Ghetto Gourmet

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The Ghetto Gourmet was an underground dining experience in the United States, in which diners paid between $40 and $100 and are served a table d'hôte meal prepared by a professional chef at a non-restaurant location. Local restaurant chefs cook on their days off. Douglas Adesko at Time magazine wrote: "Jeremy Townsend, the original Ghetto Gourmet, came up with the idea when his brother, a line cook, wanted to try some dishes. They started in their house in Oakland, California. Two years and one visit from a health inspector later, Townsend took his idea mobile, trying out chefs in other cities. 'My ultimate dream is to tour the country like a rock band, except with dinner parties,' he says."[1]

In addition to Time, The Ghetto Gourmet has been featured in the San Francisco Chronicle, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, and Marketplace.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Joel Stein. "Secret Suppers", Time, November 6, 2006. Accessed June 5, 2008.

External links[edit]