HD 32450

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HD 32450
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Lepus
Right ascension 05h 02m 28.42030s[1]
Declination −21° 15′ 23.9203″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 8.317[2]
(8.66 / 10.60)[3]
Characteristics
Spectral type M0V[4]
U−B color index +1.15[5]
B−V color index +1.42[5]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) −11.00 ± 0.38[6] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: −143.42[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −221.81[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 116.59 ± 1.51[1] mas
Distance 28.0 ± 0.4 ly
(8.6 ± 0.1 pc)
Orbit[3]
Period (P) 43.55 ± 0.27 yr
Semi-major axis (a) 1.062 ± 0.049″
Eccentricity (e) 0.720 ± 0.028
Inclination (i) 60.7 ± 2.1°
Longitude of the node (Ω) 246.5 ± 3.9°
Periastron epoch (T) B 1997.46 ± 0.86
Argument of periastron (ω)
(secondary)
280.6 ± 1.2°
Details[7]
HD 32450 A
Mass 0.59 M
HD 32450 B
Mass 0.37 M
Other designations
GJ 185, HIP 23455, SAO 170003, LTT 2151
Database references
SIMBAD data
ARICNS A
B

HD 32450, also known as Gliese 185 is a binary star in the constellation Lepus. It is located about 28 light years from the Solar System. This star will make its closest approach to the Sun in roughly 350,000 years, when it comes within 14.8 ly (4.5 pc).[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e van Leeuwen, F.; et al. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. 
  2. ^ Koen, C.; Kilkenny, D.; van Wyk, F.; Marang, F. (2010). "UBV(RI)C JHK observations of Hipparcos-selected nearby stars". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 403 (4): 1949–1968. Bibcode:2010MNRAS.403.1949K. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.16182.x. 
  3. ^ a b "Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars". United States Naval Observatory. 
  4. ^ Houk, N.; Swift, C. (1999). "Michigan catalogue of two-dimensional spectral types for the HD Stars, Vol. 5". Michigan Spectral Survey. 5: 0. Bibcode:1999MSS...C05....0H. 
  5. ^ a b Mermilliod, J.-C. (1986). "Compilation of Eggen's UBV data, transformed to UBV (unpublished)". Catalogue of Eggen's UBV data. Bibcode:1986EgUBV........0M. 
  6. ^ Nidever, David L.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, R. Paul; Fischer, Debra A.; Vogt, Steven S. (2002). "Radial Velocities for 889 Late‐Type Stars". The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series. 141 (2): 503. Bibcode:2002ApJS..141..503N. arXiv:astro-ph/0112477Freely accessible. doi:10.1086/340570. 
  7. ^ Ward-Duong, K.; Patience, J.; De Rosa, R. J.; Bulger, J.; Rajan, A.; Goodwin, S. P.; Parker, R. J.; McCarthy, D. W.; Kulesa, C. (2015). "The M-dwarfs in Multiples (MINMS) survey - I. Stellar multiplicity among low-mass stars within 15 pc". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 449 (3): 2618. Bibcode:2015MNRAS.449.2618W. arXiv:1503.00724Freely accessible. doi:10.1093/mnras/stv384. 
  8. ^ García-Sánchez, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Latham, D. W.; Stefanik, R. P.; Paredes, J. M. (2001). "Stellar encounters with the solar system". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 379 (2): 634–659. Bibcode:2001A&A...379..634G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20011330.  See Table 4, p. 644.