Gozelo I, Count of Montaigu

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Gozelon (died 1064), Count of Montaigu and then Count of Behogne,[1] of unknown parentage. He was also avoué of Saint-Barthélémy, Liège, beginning in 1043. Onomastics would suggest that the name Gozelon implies a family connection with Gozlin, Count of the Ardennes, who had a grandson Gozelon, Count of Bastogne, the successor to his father Reginar. Another one of Gozlin's grandsons (the son of Godfrey the Captive), was also known as Gozelo, but there is no real evidence to believe there was a relationship.

In 1038, in an act witnessed by Gozelon, Gothelo the Great, Duke of Lorraine, Arnold I, Count of Looz, and an unknown count named Sigebold, the Archbishop of Trier Poppo von Babenberg restored the monastery of St. Matheus of Trier. Gozelon apparently destroyed the church at Marly and was subsequently buried at the church of Saint Hubert, the Apostle of the Ardennes.

Gozelon married Ermentrude (Ermengarde) de Grandpré, daughter of Widrich I, Count of Clermont, and his wife Hersende. Gozelon and Ermentrude had five children:

After the death of Gozelon, his widow Ermentrude married Fredelon of Esch and had at least one child, Giselbert, Count of Esch. Members of the House of Esch could be seen in historical documents until the 13th century but then vanished.

Gozelon was the patriarch of the family of Counts of Montaigu that eventually merged with the Counts of Duras, and then with the Counts of Looz. Gozelon was succeeded as Count of Montaigu by his son Conon, a knight in service of his brother-in-law Godfrey of Bouillon, the first ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. For further details on the transition from Gozelon to his son, see Conon (succession).

Sources[edit]

Medieval Lands Project, Comtes de Montaigu

Wolters, Mathias J., Notice Historique sur lAncien Comté de Duras en Hesbaie, McNally Jackson, 1855 (available on Google Books)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Murray, Alan V. (1992). "The Army of Godfrey of Bouillon, 1096–1099" (PDF).