Granville Technology Group

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Granville Technology Group
Public company
IndustryRetail
Founded1994
Defunct2005
HeadquartersSimonstone, Lancashire (1994–2005)
Key people
Tahir Mohsan (founder) (Director, 1994–2005)
ProductsComputers
Number of employees
1,600

Granville Technology Group Ltd was a British computer retailer and manufacturer based in Simonstone, near Burnley, Lancashire, marketing its products under the brand names Time, Tiny, Colossus, and MJN.[1]

It sold mainly through mail order, though late in its life, the firm added a chain of shops in the United Kingdom that traded as The Computer Shop, and rapidly grew to over 300 stores.[2] The main competitors were PC World, Comet, and Maplin.

History[edit]

Formerly known as Time Group, the company was formed in 1994, by Tahir Mohsan.[3][4]

The manufacturing unit was located at Time Technology Park, in Simonstone. The company produced computers under the Tiny and Time Computers brands, although tracing the ownership of these brands later proved difficult for administrators Grant Thornton due to the group's convoluted and opaque ownership structure.[5]

In June 2003, in the year ending, the group made profits of £2.5m before tax with a turnover of £207m,[4] and sold nearly 20 million personal computers.[citation needed] The company went into receivership on 27 July 2005, due to the fall in demand for personal computers. That month, it employed 1,600 people, and was one of the largest retailers of computers in the United Kingdom.[6]

Time UK[edit]

Time UK (a.k.a. Time Computers) was the main supplier for Granville Technology, and was the actual manufacturer of products resold by Granville: computers, notebooks, and flat screen televisions.[1] The company supported consumers who purchased Time products from Granville Technology Group Ltd.[6] The company’s manufacturing plant and headquarter was based at Simonstone, Lancashire, in the private industrial park, the Time Technology Park, named after its brand.

With a turnover of £750 million during the 1990s, the firm became Britain’s largest computer manufacturer, by establishing its market in the United Kingdom, Middle East, and the Far East.[1] It was selling computers through retailers, and a chain of stores, The Computer Shop, which was established by Granville Technology Group.

Mohsan subdivided the company into Time Computers and Time Computer Systems, in order to segregate manufacturing and retailing. The company went into administration on 27 July 2005.[7] In March 2006, the brand was rebranded as Time UK.[8]

The Time UK television commercials used a duo entitled Dr. Apocalypse & Egore, an "outer space" duo. Another advert used Leonard Nimoy, of Star Trek fame, who reprised his Mr. Spock character. Before the adverts starring Dr. Apocalypse & Egore. Time UK released a campaign with the slogan: we're on your side. The adverts involved a man, bearing a resemblance to Greg Pope, as a computer salesman.

In August 2000, Time UK handed its advertising account to HHCL & Partners, which saw the end of the adverts featuring Leonard Nimoy.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Andy Beckett (2 December 2005). "The tycoon who fell to earth". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  2. ^ John Oates (27 Jul 2005). "Granville Technology goes into administration". The Register. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  3. ^ Robert Blincoe (11 May 2001). "Time Computers and its secret CEO". The Register. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  4. ^ a b Melanie Feisst (28 Jul 2005). "Time called on The Computer Shop". The Telegraph. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  5. ^ Colin Barker (1 August 2005). "Unravelling the mystery of Time Computers". Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  6. ^ a b "Tiny PCs goes into administration". BBC News. 27 July 2005. Retrieved 17 March 2014.
  7. ^ "Tiny PCs goes into administration". BBC. 27 July 2005. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  8. ^ "Time Computers back in business". Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  9. ^ "HHCL wins £30 million Time Computers account". campaignlive.co.uk. 30 August 2000. Retrieved 6 October 2017.