Handy-class destroyer

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HMS Hunter
HMS Hunter
Class overview
Name: Handy class
Builders: Fairfields, Govan
Operators:  Royal Navy
Preceded by: Conflict class
Succeeded by: Sunfish class
Built: 1895
In commission: 1895–1914
Completed: 3
Retired: 3
General characteristics
Type: Torpedo boat destroyer
Displacement: 275 long tons (279 t)
Length: 194 ft (59 m)
Propulsion: Thornycroft boilers, 4,000 hp (2,983 kW)
Speed: 27 knots (50 km/h; 31 mph)
Complement: 53
Armament:

Three Handy-class destroyers served with the Royal Navy. Handy, Hart and Hunter were all built by Fairfield.

Design and construction[edit]

As part of the 1893–1894 Naval Estimates, the British Admiralty placed orders for 36 torpedo-boat destroyers, all to be capable of 27 knots (50 km/h; 31 mph), as a follow-on to the six prototype "26-knotters" ordered in the previous 1892–1893 Estimates. Of the 36 destroyers, three ships (Handy, Hart and Hunter) were ordered from Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company of Govan,[1] the first torpedo craft to be built by that shipyard.[2] As typical for torpedo craft at the time, the Admiralty left detailed design to the builders, laying down only broad requirements.[3][4]

Fairfield's design was 197 feet (60.05 m) long overall and 194 feet (59.13 m) between perpendiculars, with a beam of 19 feet 5 inches (5.92 m) and a draught of 7 feet 6 inches (2.29 m). Displacement was 275 long tons (279 t) light and 310 long tons (310 t) full load,[2] while the ship's complement was 53 officers and men.[5] Three Thornycroft boilers fed steam at 215 pounds per square inch (1,480 kPa) to two 3-cylinder triple expansion steam engines rated at 4,000 indicated horsepower (3,000 kW) and driving two propeller shafts.[2] Two funnels were fitted.[6] Armament consisted of a single QF 12 pounder 12 cwt[a] gun and three 6-pounder guns, with two 18-inch (450 mm) torpedo tubes.[7] As a gunboat, one of the torpedo tubes could be removed to accommodate a further two six-pounders.[8][9][b]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ "Cwt" is the abbreviation for hundredweight, 12cwt referring to the weight of the gun.
  2. ^ While many of the 27-knotters later carried both the two torpedo tubes and all 5 six-pounder guns, stability concerns prevented Handy from following suit.[10]
Citations
  1. ^ Lyon 2001, pp. 19–20.
  2. ^ a b c Lyon 2001, p. 87.
  3. ^ Chesneau and Kolesnik 1979, p. 87.
  4. ^ Manning 1961, p. 39.
  5. ^ Manning 1961, p. 36.
  6. ^ Friedman 2009, p. 48.
  7. ^ Friedman 2009, p. 291.
  8. ^ Lyon 2001, pp. 98–99.
  9. ^ Friedman 2009, p. 40.
  10. ^ Lyon 2003, p. 100.
Bibliography
  • Brassey, T.A. (1897). The Naval Annual 1897. Portsmouth, UK: J. Griffin and Co. 
  • Brown, D.K. (2003). Warrior to Dreadnought: Warship Development 1860–1905. London: Caxton Editions. ISBN 1-84067-5292. 
  • Chan Lau Kit-Ching (1990). China, Britain & Hong Kong 1895–1945. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press. ISBN 962-201-409-7. 
  • Chesneau, Roger; Kolesnik, Eugene M, eds. (1979). Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1860–1905. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-133-5. 
  • Crowe, George (1903). The Commission of H.M.S. Terrible: 1898–1902. London: George Newnes. 
  • Friedman, Norman (2009). British Destroyers: From Earliest Days to the Second World War. Barnsley, UK: Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84832-049-9. 
  • Gardiner, Robert; Gray, Randal, eds. (1985). Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-245-5. 
  • Lyon, David (2001). The First Destroyers. London: Caxton Editions. ISBN 1-84067-3648. 
  • Manning, T. D. (1961). The British Destroyer. London: Putnam & Co. Ltd. 
  • Manning, T.D. The British Destroyer. Godfrey Cave Associates. ISBN 0-906223-13-X. 

External links[edit]