Harkleroad wind turbine

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Harkleroad wind turbine
Wind turbine on Harkleroad workshop.jpg
General information
Address19 Harkle Road
Town or cityNovato, California 94945-4109
CountryUnited States
Coordinates38°06′03″N 122°33′45″W / 38.10086°N 122.56246°W / 38.10086; -122.56246Coordinates: 38°06′03″N 122°33′45″W / 38.10086°N 122.56246°W / 38.10086; -122.56246
Technical details
Floor area1562 sq/ft
Design and construction
ArchitectSamuel A. Harkleroad
Other information
Number of rooms3 br

The Harkleroad wind turbine was built to generate electricity.[1] It appears along a heavily traveled freeway in northern California.[2]

Around 1960, Sam Harkleroad designed and constructed three unusual structures on a plot of land in Novato, Marin County, California:

Sam Harkleroad[edit]

Sam Harkleroad was born on October 20, 1909, and grew up on a farm in Fresno. His education ended with high school. He lived much of his life in Marin County. Harkleroad died on June 12, 1993, at the age of 83.

Harkleroad was a contractor, who liked to use recycled materials.

The Harkleroad structures are on a street named Harkle Road.[5]

Round house[edit]

The round house once appeared in a Popular Mechanics article, which explained how the house was able to rotate 320 degrees, while the plumbing and electrical systems continued to function.[6]

Harkleroad round house
Round house
Round house with part of support base showing

Taco house[edit]

One of the three buildings has a saddle roof made of 2-by-4 lumber.[7]

Harkleroad Taco house

This house was for sale in 1959, with a minimum bid of $32,000.[8]

Workshop[edit]

The roof of the workshop has a Savonius wind turbine. The turbine once provided electricity for the workshop, however, it is no longer used for electricity. Instead, it provides a novel sight for travelers along U.S. Route 101 in Marin County, California.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Round House Rotates 320 Degrees : Imagination Fuels His Many Oddball Creations". The Los Angeles Times. June 29, 1986. Retrieved August 7, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Mal Sharpe, Sandra Sharpe (August 20, 1997). "HOMES WITH A TWIST / Step inside some of the Bay Area's most unconventional houses and meet the people who created them". SFGATE. Hearst Communications. Retrieved August 7, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "California Mid-Century Modern Residential Buildings". Roadside Architecture. Retrieved August 7, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Californian Makes An Unusual Roof". Toledo, Ohio: The Blade. July 23, 1061. p. 8. Retrieved August 7, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Novato—Did You Know?". Marin Magazine. 2009. Retrieved August 7, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Carousel House Spins for a View. Popular Mechanics. 1964. Retrieved August 7, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "This is the House that Sam Built". San Rafael, California: Daily Independent Journal. May 11, 1956. p. 22. Retrieved August 9, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Bill Almeida and Tonie Brown (June 1959). "Novato—50 Years Ago" (PDF). The Novato Historian. Novato History Museum. Retrieved August 7, 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]