Harvey Brooks (physicist)

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Harvey Brooks
Born (1915-08-05)August 5, 1915
Died May 28, 2004(2004-05-28) (aged 88)
Nationality American
Education Yale University
Alma mater Harvard University
Known for Contributions to the fundamental theory of semiconductors and the band structure of metals
Awards Ernest O. Lawrence Award of the Atomic Energy Commission, the Philip Hauge Abelson Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
Scientific career
Fields Physics
Institutions Harvard University

Harvey Brooks (August 5, 1915 – May 28, 2004) was an American physicist, "a pioneer in incorporating science into public policy", [1] notable for helping to shape national science policies and who served on science advisory committees in the administrations of Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon B. Johnson. [2] [3] [4] Brooks was also notable for his contributions to the fundamental theory of semiconductors and the band structure of metals.[3] Brooks was dean of the Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences of the Harvard University.[2] Brooks was also president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences,[2] a member of the National Academy of Sciences,[2] the National Academy of Engineering[2] and the Council on Foreign Relations.[2] He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering "for technical contributions to solid-state engineering and nuclear reactors; leadership in national technological decisions".[3] He was also Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics and Benjamin Peirce Professor of Technology and Public Policy at Harvard University.[3] Brooks was also the founder and editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids.[3] He received the Ernest O. Lawrence Award of the Atomic Energy Commission, the Philip Hauge Abelson Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.[3]

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