Henry Unwin Addington

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Henry Unwin Addington (24 March 1790 – 6 March 1870)[1] was a British diplomat and civil servant.

Background[edit]

Born at Blounts Court, he was the second son of John Hiley Addington, brother of Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth, and his wife Mary, daughter of Henry Unwin.[2] He was educated at Winchester School and entered the Foreign Office in 1807.[2]

Career[edit]

Addington was attached to the diplomatic mission to Sicily under William Amherst, 1st Earl Amherst in 1809 and took part in the negotiations between Spain and his colonies in 1812.[2] He was transferred to Berlin in April 1813 and to Stockholm in September.[2] In the next year he was appointed Secretary of Legation to Switzerland, an office he held until 1818.[3] He executed this position again in Copenhagen in 1821, however became chargé d'affaires in Washington already a year later.[3]

Addington was promoted to plenipotentiary in London for negotiations with the United States of America in 1826,[2] and was moved to Frankfurt am Main as Minister Plenipotentiary to the German Confederation in 1828.[3] In the following year he was appointed Envoy Extraordinary to Spain.[2] In 1833, he returned to England and became Permanent Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs in 1842.[4] In 1854, he retired and was sworn of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom.[1]

Family[edit]

On 17 November 1836, he married Eleanor Anne Estcourt, eldest daughter of Thomas Grimston Bucknall Estcourt at St George's, Hanover Square.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Leigh Rayment - Privy Council of the United Kingdom". Retrieved 3 July 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Dod, Robert P. (1860). The Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland. London: Whitaker and Co. p. 84. 
  3. ^ a b c "German Historical Institute London, Official Website - Henry Unwin Addington". Retrieved 4 July 2009. 
  4. ^ Haydn, Joseph (1851). The Book of Dignities: Containing Rolls of the Official Personages of the British Empire. London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longman's. p. 176. 
  5. ^ Dodsley, James (1837). The Annual Register. London: Baldwin & Cradock. p. 174. 

Literature[edit]

  • Oliver Werner, Privater Eindruck und öffentliche Politik. Der britische Diplomat Henry Unwin Addington in Deutschland, 1813/14 und 1828/29. In: Uwe Ziegler/Horst Carl (ed.), "In unserer Liebe nicht glücklich." Kultureller Austausch zwischen Großbritannien und Deutschland 1770-1840, Goettingen (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht) 2014, p. 143-158.
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
John Ralph Milbanke
Minister Plenipotentiary to the German Confederation
1828 – 1829
Succeeded by
George William Chad
Preceded by
George Bosanquet
Envoy Extraordinary to Spain
1829 – 1833
Succeeded by
George Villiers
Government offices
Preceded by
John Backhouse
Permanent Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
1842 – 1854
Succeeded by
Edmund Hammond