Hexagon Sun

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Hexagon Sun is an artistic collective based in the Pentland Hills, Scotland. The confirmed members are Mike Sandison, Marcus Eoin, Peter Iain Campbell (a.k.a. "PIC"), Simon Goderich (a.k.a. "goderich"), Mark David Garrett (a.k.a. "mdg"), Rachel Stewart, Alan Mackenzie, Andrew Wilson, and Christopher Horne (a.k.a. "christ.").[citation needed]. The most well known venture of the collective is the electronic music band Boards of Canada, of whom Eoin and Sandison are the sole members. The band has used the Hexagon Sun name for their recording studio and has released songs with the title "Turquoise Hexagon Sun" and "Orange Hexagon Sun" on the album Boc Maxima, the Hi Scores EP, and later, Music Has the Right to Children.

Enigma and intrigue[edit]

The existence of Hexagon Sun and oblique references to it in interviews, web sites and album packaging have contributed to what many people regard as the mythological aura surrounding Boards of Canada. Opinions on this subject differ greatly; certain fans of Boards of Canada and their record label Warp regard Hexagon Sun as a mysterious cult, while others believe that it is simply a title for the band's recording studio.

It is believed by their fans that Hexagon Sun has held parties in the past, which may be how the collective originally formed. These get-togethers were soon known as "Redmoon" events, after the occurrence during one such party of a lunar eclipse which colors the moon red.[citation needed].

Hexagon Sun's presence on the Internet has been limited to its website, hexagonsun.com, which until 2005 when it redirected to boardsofcanada.com, was simply a small graphic of mirrored turquoise-color text on a blue background. When reflected, the text reads "the internet is evil. wake up."[1] In 2013, hexagonsun.com forwards to cosecha-transmisiones.com (The url translates from Spanish to "harvest transmissions"), a simple logon page made by Boards of Canada, that was used as part of the unveiling for the album Tomorrow's Harvest. If one is to look at the source code for the page of cosecha-transmisiones.com, the image of a hexagon in ASCII fashion is revealed.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "HexagonSun.com". Archived from the original on February 13, 2003. Retrieved 2005-08-10. 

External links[edit]