Araucaria cunninghamii

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Araucaria cunninghamii
Araucaria cunninghamii.jpg
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pinophyta
Class: Pinopsida
Order: Pinales
Family: Araucariaceae
Genus: Araucaria
Section: A. sect. Eutacta
Species: A. cunninghamii
Binomial name
Araucaria cunninghamii
Mudie[2]
Synonyms[2]
  • Altingia cunninghamii (Mudie) Corrie
  • Eutassa cunninghamii (Mudie) G.Don
  • Eutacta cunninghamii (Mudie) Link

Araucaria cunninghamii is a species of Araucaria known as hoop pine. Other less commonly used names include colonial pine, Queensland pine,[3] Dorrigo pine, Moreton Bay pine and Richmond River pine.[1] The scientific name honours the botanist and explorer Allan Cunningham, who collected the first specimens in the 1820s.

Habitat[edit]

The species is found in the dry rainforests of New South Wales and Queensland and in New Guinea. The trees can live up to 450 years and grow to a height of 60 metres.[4] The bark is rough, splits naturally, and peels easily.[5]

Description[edit]

The leaves on young trees are awl-shaped, 1–2 cm long, about 2 mm thick at the base, and scale-like, incurved, 1–2 cm long and 4 mm broad on mature trees. The cones are ovoid, 8–10 cm long and 6–8 cm diameter, and take about 18 months to mature. They disintegrate at maturity to release the nut-like edible seeds.

Species[edit]

There are two varieties:

Cultivation and uses[edit]

The wood is a high quality timber that is particularly important to the plywood industry and also used for furniture, veneer, joinery, panelling, particle board, flooring and boats.[6] Most natural stands in Australia and Papua New Guinea have been depleted by logging. It is now mainly found on timber plantations; however, the species continues to thrive in protected areas, including Lamington National Park where at least one walking track is named after it.[7]

Australian Aboriginal use[edit]

Australian Aborigines used the resin as cement.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Thomas, P. (2011). "Araucaria cunninghamii". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2011: e.T32835A9734286. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2011-2.RLTS.T32835A9734286.en. Retrieved 13 January 2018. 
  2. ^ a b "Araucaria cunninghamii". World Checklist of Selected Plant Families (WCSP). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 23 March 2017. 
  3. ^ "Hoop Pine". Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries. Retrieved 23 March 2017. 
  4. ^ "Hoop Pine". about NSW. Archived from the original on 13 March 2011. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 
  5. ^ "Species: Araucaria cunninghamii (Hoop Pine)". Plantation Information Network. Archived from the original on 18 March 2012. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 
  6. ^ "Hoop Pine". Australian Timber Database. Timber.net.au. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 
  7. ^ "Nature, culture and history". Queensland Government. Archived from the original on 14 August 2012. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 
  8. ^ Corlett, Eloise. "An Evolution Of Ethnobotany". ByronBayNow. Archived from the original on 18 February 2011. Retrieved 25 August 2012. 

External links[edit]