Howell Cobb (born 1772)

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Howell Cobb (August 3, 1772 – May 26, 1818) was an American politician, farmer and soldier.

Born in Granville County, North Carolina, Cobb later moved to Louisville, Georgia. From February 23, 1793, until January 31, 1806, Cobb served in various military positions in the United States Army including ensign and lieutenant in the Second Sub Legion and as captain in the Artillerists and Engineers.

In 1806, Cobb was elected as Democratic-Republican to the 10th United States Congress, and he was reelected to that position in the 11th, and 12th United States Congresses. He resigned from Congress before October 1812 to accept a captain's commission in the U.S. Army to fight in the War of 1812. After his second period of military service, he returned to his plantation, Cherry Hill, northwest of Louisville. Cobb died there in 1818 and was buried in the family cemetery on that estate. At time of his death he owned several slaves. In his will he emancipated his slave William Hill. In his will he stated:

It would afford one of the greatest pleasure & satisfaction to liberate all my slaves; but such is the present existing state of Society, that by so doing I may act improperly; and it is by no means improbable that it would be no real lasting advantage to them; and I presume that their present condition, under the care & protection of generous & human masters, will be much better for them than a State of freedom.

The rest of his slaves he left to his nephew Howell Cobb.[1]

Cobb's nephew and namesake Howell Cobb served as the Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Governor of Georgia, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury and Provisional President Pro Tem of the Confederate States of America

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jefferson County. Wills, Book A, 1797-1873. Jefferson County, Georgia. p. 126. 

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United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Peter Early
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's at-large congressional district

March 4, 1807 – March 3, 1809
Succeeded by
District abolished
New district Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's 2nd congressional district

March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1811
Succeeded by
District abolished
New district Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Georgia's at-large congressional district

March 4, 1811 – September, 1812
Succeeded by
William Barnett