Howie MacDonald

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Howie MacDonald (born March 9, 1965) is a Canadian fiddler and entertainer from Westmount, Cape Breton Island. His lively Cape Breton style of fiddling has entertained audiences all over the world while travelling with The Rankin Family. He has released multiple albums including one with Ashley MacIsaac, capebretonfiddlemusicNOTCALM in 2001.[1]

MacDonald was the Conservative Party of Canada candidate for Sydney—Victoria in the 2004[2] and 2006 federal elections.[3]

Electoral record[edit]

2006 Canadian federal election: Sydney—Victoria
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Mark Eyking 20,277 49.88 -2.25 $47,473.95
New Democratic John Hugh Edwards 11,587 28.50 +0.79 $28,987.58
Conservative Howie MacDonald 7,455 18.34 +2.47 $26,033.71
Green Chris Milburn 1,336 3.29 +0.99 $537.60
Total valid votes/expense limit 40,655 100.0     $73,953
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 227 0.56 -0.23
Turnout 40,882 63.30 +2.72
Eligible voters 64,589
Liberal hold Swing -1.52
2004 Canadian federal election: Sydney—Victoria
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Mark Eyking 19,372 52.13 +2.14 $51,343.95
New Democratic John Hugh Edwards 10,298 27.71 -8.50 $24,957.69
Conservative Howie MacDonald 5,897 15.87 +2.08 $48,515.46
Green Chris Milburn 855 2.30 $580.41
Marijuana Cathy Thériault 474 1.28 none listed
Independent B. Chris Gallant 264 0.71 $165.54
Total valid votes/Expense limit 37,160 100.0     $71,187
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 297 0.79
Turnout 37,457 60.58
Eligible voters 61,826
Liberal notional hold Swing +5.32
Changes from 2000 are based on redistributed results. Conservative Party change is based on the combination of Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative Party totals.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gaelic College Faculty". The Gaelic College. Retrieved 2017-07-28.
  2. ^ "MacDonald gets nod in Sydney-Victoria". The Chronicle Herald. May 27, 2004. Archived from the original on November 26, 2004. Retrieved 2017-08-23.
  3. ^ "Candidate bio". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2017-08-23.