Ilabrat

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Ilabrat, in Assyrian, Babylonian and Akkadian mythology, is the attendant and vizier of the chief sky god Anu and part of his entourage.

Ilabrat appears on the clay tablets which contain the legend of "Adapa and the food of life" which seems to explain the origin of death. Adapa, who has earned wisdom but not eternal life, is a son of and temple priest for Ea (Enki) in Eridu, and performs rituals with bread and water.

While Adapa is fishing in a calm sea, suddenly the South Wind rises up and overturns his boat, throwing him into the water. This reference to the 'South Wind' may refer to Ninlil, wife of Enlil, who was identified as goddess of the South Wind.

Adapa is enraged, and proceeds to break the 'wings' of the South Wind, so for seven days she can not blow the freshness of the sea on the warm earth.

Adapa is summoned before the court of Anu in the heavens, and his father Ea advises him not to eat or drink anything placed before him, because he fears that this will be the food and water of death.

Anu, however, is impressed with Adapa and instead offers him the food and water of (eternal) life. However, Adapa follows the advice of Ea, and politely refuses to take any food or drink. This food and water of life offered by Anu would have made Adapa and his descendants immortal.

References[edit]

Michael Jordan, Encyclopedia of Gods, Kyle Cathie Limited, 2002