Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network

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Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network
Internet & Jurisdiction Multistakeholder Policy Network Logo.png
Formation 2012; 6 years ago (2012)
Type Non-profit organization
Headquarters Paris, France
Website www.internetjurisdiction.net
Formerly called
Internet & Jurisdiction Project

The Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network,[1] also known as "I&J Policy Network", "Internet & Jurisdiction, or simply "I&J", is a multistakeholder organization addressing the tension between the cross-border Internet and national jurisdictions.[2] It's Secretariat facilitates a global policy process between key stakeholders to enable transnational cooperation and policy coherence. Participants in the Policy Network work together to preserve the cross-border nature of the Internet, protect human rights, fight abuses, and enable the global digital economy.[3][4][5] Since 2012, the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network has engaged more than 200 key entities from different stakeholder groups around the world, including governments, the world's largest Internet companies, the technical community, civil society groups, leading universities and international organizations.[6]

The Secretariat of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network is based in Paris, France. It was founded in 2012 by Executive Director Bertrand de La Chapelle and Deputy Director Paul Fehlinger.[7][8]

Enabling Multistakeholder Cooperation[edit]

The Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network bridges relevant stakeholder groups and policy silos in order to enable transnational cooperation. It strives to fill the institutional gap in Internet governance at the intersection of digital economy, human rights, and cybersecurity. Through global, regional, and thematic meetings,[9] its Secretariat facilitates a neutral dialogue process with the mission of building trust among the different actors and help them develop the operational solutions necessary for the coexistence of diverse laws on the cross-border Internet.

The Internet & Jurisdiction Secretariat reports every year on progress at the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) organized by the United Nations. At the IGF 2016, The Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network was granted for the first time an "Open Forum",[10] a format traditionally reserved to treaty-based organizations. In June 2016 at the OECD Ministerial Meeting on the Digital Economy[11] in Cancún, Mexico, the Background Report Economic and Social Benefits of Internet Openness, cited the Internet & Jurisdiction multistakeholder process as being exemplary: "The [Principles for Internet Policy Making of the 2011 OECD Council Recommendation] endorse the development of voluntary codes of conduct through multi-stakeholder processes, such as the Internet & Jurisdiction [Policy Network]."[12] In April 2018, the G7 Cyber Group expressed its support for the ongoing work of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network.[13]

Programs of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network[edit]

As of 2018, the work of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network is structured around three programs, which structure the ongoing multistakeholder development of policy standards and operational frameworks:[14]

  • Data & Jurisdiction: How can transnational data flows and the protection of privacy be reconciled with lawful access requirements to address crime?
  • Content & Jurisdiction: How can we manage globally available content in light of the diversity of local laws and norms applicable on the internet?
  • Domains & Jurisdiction: How can the neutrality of the internet’s technical layer be preserved when national laws are applied on the Domain Name System?

Global Conferences of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network[edit]

The Global Conferences of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network are milestone meetings in which stakeholders take stock of the intersessional work and decide on common objectives and next steps for the policy development work. Stakeholder Plenary Sessions are held in the innovative heptagon seating format invented by the Secretariat of the Policy Network.

1st Global Conference in Paris[edit]

The 1st Global Conference of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network took place on November 14–16, 2016 in Paris, France.[15] It was organized in partnership with the Government of France and institutionally supported by the OECD, the European Commission, UNESCO, the Council of Europe, the Slovak Presidency of the Council of the European Union, and ICANN. The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs provided its Ministerial Conference Center as the venue. It was the first time that more than 200 senior representatives from more than 40 countries from states, Internet companies, technical operators, civil society, academia and international organizations gathered to specifically address the issue of jurisdiction on the Internet. As The Economist reported: “If nothing is done, many who met [at the Global Conference of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network] in Paris worried, the open internet could be a thing of the past within a decade or two. What is needed, they said, is more international co-operation—but not of the old kind.”[16] As an outcome, stakeholders identified concrete "areas for cooperation" to help the development of shared policy standards and frameworks for legal interoperability and due process across borders. The Global Internet and Jurisdiction Conference firmly placed the topic of jurisdiction on the Internet governance agenda, as recommended in the 2014 NETmundial Roadmap for the Future Evolution of Internet Governance Ecosystem.[17] The 1st Global Conference of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network was recognized by the 2017 United Nations Secretary-General's Report "Progress Made in the Implementation of and Follow-up to the Outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society",[18] and the I&J Secretariat was invited to present outcomes to the G7 Cyber Group in March 2017[19] and the G20 Multistakeholder Conference on the Digital Future in April 2017.[20]

2nd Global Conference in Ottawa[edit]

The 2nd Global Conference of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network took place on February 26–28, 2018 in Ottawa, Canada. It was organized in partnership with the Government of Canada and institutionally supported by the OECD, the European Commission, UNESCO, the Council of Europe, and ICANN. Three multistakeholder Contact Groups were formed as an outcome of the first Global Conference in Paris for each of the three Programs of the Policy Network. They elaborated in 2017 so-called "Policy Options Documents". Based on these, the over 200 senior-level stakeholder from more than 40 countries defined common objectives to develop concrete solutions to pressing jurisdictional challenges on the internet and adopted the Ottawa Roadmap.[21] The Ottawa Roadmap established for the first time agreed Work Plans with structuring components for each Program of the Policy Network to advance towards policy coherence and joint action. Ahead of the 2nd Global Conference, co-founder of the internet Vint Cerf called in a Financial Times Op-Ed upon stakeholders that "the future of the cross-border internet depends on [its outcomes]".[22] Politico asked "The internet is broken. Can this group fix it?".[23] In April 2018, the Group of Seven (G7) Cyber Group expressed its support for the "continued multi-stakeholder work under the auspices of the Internet and Jurisdiction Policy Network, including most recently the Ottawa Road Map that came out of the 2nd Global Conference on Internet and Jurisdiction held in Ottawa in February 2018".[24]

3rd Global Conference in Berlin[edit]

The 3rd Global Conference of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network will take place on June 3–5, 2019 in Berlin, Germany. It will be organized in partnership with the Government of Germany.

I&J Retrospect Database[edit]

To enable evidence-based policy innovation, Internet & Jurisdiction created the open access, indexed and searchable I&J Retrospect Database.[25] By early 2018, it contains over 1500 cases from more than 120 countries dating back to 2012 that document the increasing tension between the cross-border Internet and national jurisdictions.[26] It is a resource that allows stakeholders to better understand global trends.[27] Every month, the members of the I&J Observatory crowd-rank the top 20 cases that are added to the I&J Retrospect Database. The I&J Observatory is an international network of 31 leading experts from 29 universities and research centers in 17 countries that supports the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network. Members come from institutions such as Harvard University, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society, Institute for Technology & Society Rio, National Law University Delhi, Oxford University, and Stanford University.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Internet & Jurisdiction - A Global Multistakeholder Policy Network". www.internetjurisdiction.net. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  2. ^ "Why Global Online Trade Is Threatened By a 'Legal Arms Race'". Fortune. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  3. ^ "Lost in the splinternet". The Economist. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  4. ^ Grassegger, Hannes (2014-02-11). "NSA-Affäre: Staaten nehmen das "Inter" aus dem Internet". Die Zeit. ISSN 0044-2070. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  5. ^ "Faut-il une Cour internationale de l'Internet ?". L'Obs (in French). Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  6. ^ "Mission". Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  7. ^ "Net Politics A Legal Arms Race Threatens the Future of the Internet - Net Politics". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  8. ^ Fehlinger, Paul; Chapelle, Bertrand de La (2016-04-18). "The Legal Arms Race Threatening the Future of the Global Internet". Slate. ISSN 1091-2339. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  9. ^ "Events". Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  10. ^ "List of Open Forums at the IGF 2016". Internet Governance Forum. 
  11. ^ "Digital Economy Ministerial Meeting - Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development". www.oecd.org. Retrieved 2017-04-30. 
  12. ^ "ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL BENEFITS OF INTERNET OPENNESS - OECD Ministerial Meeting Background Report". OECD. 
  13. ^ "Chair's report of the meeting of the G7 Ise-Shima Cyber Group – Sommet du G7 – G7 Summit". g7.gc.ca. Retrieved 2018-04-26. 
  14. ^ "Work of the Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network". Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network. 
  15. ^ "Internet & Jurisdiction - A Global Multistakeholder Policy Network". www.internetjurisdiction.net. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  16. ^ "What is the "splinternet"?". The Economist. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  17. ^ "NetMundial Multistakeholder Statement" (PDF). 
  18. ^ "United Nations, General Assembly, A/72/64-E/2017/12 Secretary General's Report" (PDF). 
  19. ^ "I&J Presents Work and GIJC 2016 outcomes to G7 Cyber Group". Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network. 
  20. ^ "G20: I&J Presented Progress at Conference on Digital Future". Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network. 
  21. ^ "Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network - Ottawa Roadmap 2018" (PDF). 
  22. ^ "Rebuild Internet Governance before it's too late". Financial Times. February 20, 2018. 
  23. ^ "The internet is broken. Can this group fix it?". POLITICO. 2018-02-25. Retrieved 2018-04-26. 
  24. ^ "Chair's report of the meeting of the G7 Ise-Shima Cyber Group – Sommet du G7 – G7 Summit". g7.gc.ca. Retrieved 2018-04-26. 
  25. ^ "I&J Retrospect Database". Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network. 
  26. ^ "Lost in the splinternet". The Economist. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  27. ^ "Members of the I&J Observatory Network". Internet & Jurisdiction Policy Network.