Júlio Prates de Castilhos

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Júlio de Castilhos
Júlio de Castilhos.jpg
Governor of Rio Grande do Sul
In office
25 January 1893 – 25 January 1898
Preceded byFernando Abbott
Succeeded byBorges de Medeiros
In office
15 July 1891 – 12 November 1891
Preceded byFernando Abbott
Succeeded byGoverning Junta
Personal details
Born(1860-06-29)June 29, 1860
São Martinho, district of Cruz Alta (now Júlio de Castilhos), Empire of Brazil
DiedOctober 24, 1903(1903-10-24) (aged 43)
Porto Alegre, Brazil
Political partyPRR
Professionlawyer

Júlio Prates de Castilhos (Cruz Alta, 29 June 1860 — Porto Alegre, 24 October 1903) was a Brazilian journalist and politician, having been elected Patriarch of Rio Grande do Sul.[1]

He was elected twice as the governor of Rio Grande do Sul and was the principal author of the State Constitution of 1891 and a model for many future politicians of the region.[2] He disseminated positivist ideas in Brazil.

On July 15, 1891, Julio de Castilhos was elected president of the state of Rio Grande do Sul. However, with the November 3rd coup of Deodoro da Fonseca, he was deposed on November 3 that year.[1] He re-ran for the same office one year later, without adversaries, and regained his old post. Less than a year later, the unsuccessful Federalist Riograndense Revolution began, with one of the rebel force's demands being his removal from power.[3] His opposers claimed that the State Constitution granted the state governor with near-dictatorial powers.

The town of Júlio de Castilhos, where he was born, is named after him.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Júlio Prates de Castilhos" (in Portuguese). UOL - Educação. Retrieved 22 October 2012.
  2. ^ Margaret Bakos, Júlio de Castilhos: Positivismo, abolição e república (EDIPUCRS, 2006: ISBN 85-7430-601-0), p. 9.
  3. ^ "Na Revolução Federalista, em 1893, senadores chegaram a pegar em armas". Senado Federal (in Portuguese). 2015-08-03. Retrieved 2018-05-19.

External links[edit]

Media related to Júlio Prates de Castilhos at Wikimedia Commons