J. Joseph Smith

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John Joseph Smith
JJosephSmith.jpg
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
September 2, 1960 – November 6, 1971
Appointed by Dwight D. Eisenhower
Preceded by Carroll C. Hincks
Succeeded by Thomas Joseph Meskill
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut
In office
November 4, 1941 – September 2, 1960
Appointed by Franklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded by Edwin Stark Thomas
Succeeded by William H. Timbers
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut
In office
1953–1960
Preceded by Carroll C. Hincks
Succeeded by Robert P. Anderson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Connecticut's 5th district
In office
January 3, 1935 – November 4, 1941
Preceded by Edward W. Goss
Succeeded by Joseph E. Talbot
Personal details
Born (1904-01-25)January 25, 1904
Waterbury, Connecticut
Died February 16, 1980(1980-02-16) (aged 76)
Waterbury, Connecticut
Alma mater Yale University
Yale Law School
Occupation Attorney, Judge

John Joseph Smith (January 25, 1904 – February 16, 1980) was an American lawyer, member of the United States House of Representatives, and federal judge from Connecticut.

Early life and education[edit]

Smith was born in Waterbury, Connecticut, on January 25, 1904.[1][2]

He attended the public schools.[2] He earned his B.A. from Yale University in 1925 and his LL.B. degree from Yale's law department (later Yale Law School) in 1927.[1][2]

Career[edit]

Smith was admitted to the bar in 1927.[1] He was a research fellow at Yale Law School from 1927 to 1928.[1][2] He was in private practice in Waterbury from 1928 to 1941.[1]

Smith served in the Field Artillery Reserves from 1925 to 1935.[2]

He was elected as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives, serving as a representative from Connecticut from 1935 to 1941 (in the Seventy-fourth, Seventy-fifth, Seventy-sixth, and Seventy-seventh Congresses).[1][2]

On October 16, 1941, Smith was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut, to the seat vacated by Edwin S. Thomas.[1] Smith was confirmed by the Senate on October 28, 1941, and he received commission two days later.[1] Smith resigned his seat in Congress to assume his judicial post.[2] Smith served as chief judge of the court from 1953 to 1960.[1]

On January 11, 1960, Smith was nominated by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, to the seat vacated by Carroll Clark Hincks.[1] Smith was confirmed by the Senate on September 1, 1960, and received commission the next day.[1][2]

Later life and death[edit]

Smith assumed senior status on November 6, 1971.[1][2] He remained on the court until his death in Waterbury on February 16, 1980.[1] Smith is interred at Calvary Cemetery, Waterbury.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Smith resided in West Hartford, Connecticut.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m J. Joseph Smith, Biographical Directory of Federal Judges (Federal Judicial Center).
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k J. Joseph Smith, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

References[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Edward W. Goss
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Connecticut's 5th congressional district

January 3, 1935 – November 4, 1941
Succeeded by
Joseph E. Talbot
Legal offices
Preceded by
Edwin Stark Thomas
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut
1941–1960
Succeeded by
William H. Timbers
Preceded by
Carroll C. Hincks
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut
1953–1960
Succeeded by
Robert P. Anderson
Preceded by
Carroll C. Hincks
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
1960–1971
Succeeded by
Thomas Joseph Meskill