Jeffrey H. Norwitz

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Jeffrey H. Norwitz is an American expert in counter-terrorism and law enforcement.[1][2][3] Norwitz spent 38 years as a law enforcement officer, the last 25 years of which were spent with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. From 2006 through 2009 he held the John Nicholas Brown Chair of Counterterrorism at the Naval War College.[4] Norwitz is known for his publications on counter-terrorism, and for frequently being consulted as a "terrorism expert".[5][6][7][8][9][10] Norwitz is also the author of several books on counter-terrorism.[11]

Education[edit]

year Degree Institution
1970 Diploma Conard High School in West Hartford, Connecticut[1][12]
1974 Bachelor's Degree in Law Enforcement Eastern Kentucky University[1][12]
2001 Master in National Security and Strategic Studies Naval War College[1]

Military and Law enforcement career[edit]

Norwitz served as a Military policeman in the United States Army, being directly commissioned following his graduation from Eastern Kentucky University.[1][12] His duties in the army included guarding nuclear weapons. Norwitz spent three years in the Army.

In 1978 Norwitz became a Sheriff's deputy in Colorado Springs.[1][12] While there he served as a SWAT team sniper, weapons instructor and commanded the bomb disposal squad.

In 1985 he joined the Navy Criminal Investigative Service, where his speciality was counter-intelligence and counter-terrorism.[1][12] In 1994 Norwitz received the Meritorious Civilian Service Medal for actions the Navy felt had to be kept secret.[1][12] According to the Hartford Courant Secretary of the Navy John Dalton personally presented the award to Norwitz, saying: "Today's ceremony is an outstanding example of how one agent's innovative approach to a problem, coupled with his experience and dedication to his profession and his country, assisted the Navy in maintaining a technological edge, while at the same time providing an enormous monetary savings to the government."

The Hartford Courant reported it was unusual for NCIS agents to be personally decorated by the Secretary to the navy, and that Norwitz's award was supplemented by a very unusual cash payment.[12]

Norwitz received a second Meritorious Civilian Service Medal in 1998 for activities during Operation Desert Fox.[1]

Mr Norwitz served briefly (2003–04) with the Criminal Investigative Task Force at Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba, where he interviewed suspected Taliban and al Qaeda fighters.[1]

In addition to his two Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Medals he was also awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for the Global War on Terrorism and the Navy Superior Civilian Service Medal.[4]

Norwitz was selected as the 2006 distinguished alumnus by the Military Science and Leadership Department of the College of Business and Technology at Eastern Kentucky University.

After graduating with a Master in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College Norwitz was asked to be a professor at that institution.[1] He was appointed John Nicholas Brown Chair of Counterterrorism.[4] Norwitz served as both an active NCIS agent and a Professor until his retirement from government service in 2009.

Civilian career[edit]

After Norwitz retired from government service he served as National Security Advisor from 2010-2013 with Sark Securities.

Leveraging his experiences and teaching credentials, he now teaches an acclaimed course entitled, "Middle East Intelligence" for the Northeast Counterdrug Training Center.

He is also available as a guest speaker on matters of Intelligence, Counterintelligence, and Counterterrorism. Home Page.

In 2012, Norwitz was invited to speak about Homeland Security Preparedness and Globalized Intelligence at the esteemed Geneva Centre for Security Policy.

Today, Norwitz provides background investigation expertise for sensitive national security clients.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Jeffrey H. Norwitz: SPECIAL AGENT NAVAL CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIVE SERVICE" (PDF). Military Order of The World Wars. Archived from the original on 2011-09-28. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  2. ^ Jeffrey H. Norwitz (July–August 2005). "Defining Success at Guantanamo: By What Measure?" (PDF). Military Review. pp. 79–83. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  3. ^ "Terrorism Issues 2 days 3 instructors" (PDF). University of Rhode Island Center for Excellence for Explosive Detection, Mitigation and Response. He received the 21st annual Defense Department Counterintelligence Award for education excellence in 2008. In February 2009, Mr. Norwitz spoke at the United Nations on global water security. Most recently, Mr. Norwitz was a Senior Instructor with the Counterterrorism Division at Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Georgia. 
  4. ^ a b c "All Terrorism is Local" (PDF). Sark Securities. Archived from the original on 2011-09-28. Retrieved 2011-09-28. 
  5. ^ Michael Gagne (2001-09-28). "Special agent offers perspectives on terrorism". Student Newspaper at the University of Rhode Island. Retrieved 2009-01-07. [permanent dead link] mirror
  6. ^ Arline A. Fleming (2008-01-23). "Professor: Military constantly adapting". Providence Journal. Retrieved 2008-09-28. 
  7. ^ "AT THE COLLEGES". Providence Journal. 2006-10-01. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  8. ^ Matt Clark (2007-12-08). "Terrorism experts tell Lee audience: Knowledge is best weapon". Naples Daily News. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  9. ^ Jeffrey H. Norwitz (August 2002). "Combating Terrorism: With a Helmet or a Badge?". Archived from the original on 2008-07-23. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  10. ^ Matthew Flynn (2006-10-10). "A nation's new recipe for coping with disaster". Old Dominion University. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  11. ^ Jeffrey H. Norwitz, Editor. "Armed Groups: Studies in National Security, Counterterrorism, and Counterinsurgency". Archived from the original on 2010-11-07. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Robin Stansbury (1995-03-23). "Ex-resident Gets `Secret' Honor". Hartford Courant. Archived from the original on 2011-09-28. Retrieved 2011-09-28. 

External links[edit]

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