Joseph Joanovici

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Joseph Joanovici, also spelled Joinovici (1905 –1965) was a French Jewish iron supplier, who supplied both Nazi Germany and the French Resistance.

Early life[edit]

Joseph Joanovici was born on February 20, 1905 in Chișinău.

Career[edit]

During World War II, Joanovici was a war profiteer who collaborated with Nazi Germany.[1] His activities made him a millionaire.

In 1949, he was found guilty of collaboration and sentenced to a prison term. In January 1958, he escaped from France to Israel.[1] However, his permit of residence was not renewed, and he was forced to return to France.[1] There he was acquitted from most of the charges against him and was finally sentenced to one year in prison. He was released in 1962 due to health problems.

Death[edit]

He died on February 7, 1965 in Clichy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Poliakov, Léon (1960). "FRANCE". American Jewish Year Book. 61: 204. JSTOR 23605151. (registration required (help)). 

Sources[edit]

  • Philippe Bernert, Roger Wybot et la bataille pour la DST
  • L'étrange Monsieur Joseph (Joseph Joanovici) by Alphonse Boudard, édition Robert Laffont, Paris, 1998 - it was adapted as a TV film of the same name, directed by Josée Dayan from a script by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt, with Roger Hanin as Joseph Joanovici, 2001, which was criticised for what was perceived as an over-sympathetic portrayal of Joanovici.
  • (graphic novel) Il était une fois en France, "L'empire de Monsieur Joseph" (i.e. volume I), by Fabien Nury and Sylvain Vallée, Glénat 2007.