Kantano Habimana

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Kantano Habimana
Kantano Habimana.jpg
Diedallegedly before 2002[1]
OccupationRadio presenter (animateur), journalist

Kantano Habimana, commonly referred to as Kantano, was a presenter (animateur) on the Rwandan radio station Radio Télévision Libre des Mille Collines (RTLM), which played a significant role in promoting the genocide against the Tutsi. Like the station's other broadcasters, Habimana incited violence against Tutsi and moderate Hutu on the air.[2]

Habimana is often named as both the most popular[3] animateur of RTLM and the animateur with by far the most airtime. Segments by Habimana accounted for approximately 33% of RTLM airtime.[4] Habimana (and RTLM) was known for visiting roadblocks on-air and interviewing the Interahamwe militia present in order to interact with his listeners first-hand.[5] Habimana routinely announced exact whereabouts, names and license plate numbers of alleged RPF accomplices,[6][7][8] inciting targeted violence and often murder on the named individuals by groups such as the Impuzamugambi and Interahamwe militias.

At a pre-genocide court hearing on March 15, 1994, for "the incitement of citizens against each other", Habimana described RTLM broadcasters as "small fish" compared to RTLM executives such as Ferdinand Nahimana.[9]

Habimana allegedly died of AIDS in the Democratic Republic of Congo[10] before 2002.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b FH (27 February 2002). "CONVICTED ITALO-BELGIAN "HATE-RADIO" PRESENTER BEGINS TESTIMONY". Hirondelle News Agency. Retrieved 22 March 2013.
  2. ^ The Prosecutor v. Ferdinand Nahimana, Jean-Bosco Barayagwiza, Hassan Ngeze (Judgement and Sentence), ICTR-99-52-T, International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), 3 December 2003, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/404468bc2.html [accessed 21 December 2017]
  3. ^ Thompson, Allan (Ed.) (2007). The Media and the Rwanda Genocide. Pluto Press, Fountain Publishers, IDRC. p. 98. ISBN 0-74532-625-0. Retrieved 19 March 2013.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  4. ^ Thompson, Allan (Ed.) (2007). Kimani, Mary: RTLM: the Medium that Became a Tool for Mass Murder. In "The Media and the Rwanda Genocide". Pluto Press, Fountain Publishers, IDRC. p. 116. ISBN 0-74532-625-0. Retrieved 19 March 2013.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  5. ^ Thompson, Allan (Ed.) (2007). The Media and the Rwanda Genocide. Pluto Press, Fountain Publishers, IDRC. p. 99. ISBN 0-74532-625-0. Retrieved 19 March 2013.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  6. ^ Cotton, Cassandra (2007). "'Where Radio is King:' Rwanda's Hate Radio and the Lessons Learned". Atlantic International Studies Journal: 4–11. Retrieved 17 March 2013.
  7. ^ Official UN transcript; ICTR-99-52-T; P103/2B, pg.4
  8. ^ Official UN transcript; ICTR-99-52-T; P103/122, pg.1
  9. ^ The Prosecutor v. Ferdinand Nahimana, Jean-Bosco Barayagwiza, Hassan Ngeze (Judgement and Sentence), ICTR-99-52-T, pg. 176, International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), 3 December 2003, available at: http://www.refworld.org/docid/404468bc2.html [accessed 21 December 2017]
  10. ^ Li, Darryl (2004). "Echoes of violence: Considerations on radio and genocide in Rwanda". Journal of Genocide Research. 6 (1): 25. doi:10.1080/1462352042000194683. Retrieved 19 March 2013.

External links[edit]