Kelly Richey

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Kelly Richey
Born (1962-11-30) November 30, 1962 (age 55)
Lexington, Kentucky, U.S.
Genres Blues
Instruments Guitar
Years active 1986–present
Labels Sweet Lucy
Website KellyRichey.com

Kelly Richey (born November 30, 1962) is an American blues rock guitarist, singer and composer based out of Cincinnati, Ohio.[1][2]

Early life[edit]

Kelly Richey was born and raised in Lexington, Kentucky, United States,[3] in a conservative Christian household that avoided rock music. Her first instrument was the piano.[4][5] Her second instrument was a drum kit that her neighbor let her take home. After a couple of months of playing drums in her bedroom, her father offered to buy her anything she wanted; she chose the guitar. She started learning guitar at age 15; she reached a point where she was practicing 12 hours a day.[6][7][8]

Career[edit]

Kelly Richey joined Kopana Terry, Kiya Heartwood and Tony Nagy in 1986. In 1988 she sat in with Albert King at the Cuckoo Club in Nashville.[9][10] In 1990, she formed The Kelly Richey Band (KRB).[11] In 1997 she moved from Lexington, Kentucky to Mount Auburn, Cincinnati.[12] Writing of her 2001 album Sending Me Angels, Guitar Player praised her "fiery solos" and her "fast, powerful picking hand", which she credited to having played as a drummer.[13] She cites Roy Buchanan as an influence,[13] besides Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix[1] and Lonnie Mack.[14] She released eleven albums between 1994 and 2008.[6] Her 2006 album Speechless consisted entirely of instrumentals.[15] She took a break from performing in 2010.[16][17]

Equipment[edit]

Richey plays a 1965 Fender Stratocaster, the same she has played since the 1980s.[18][13] It has a 1963 body and a 1965 neck, with a traditional Fender tremolo; the pickups are Seymour Duncan and she uses SIT strings (.10-.046).[13] She plays through a Fender Super Reverb with an Ibanez Tube Screamer.[13]

Discography[edit]

  • 1994: Sister's Gotta Problem[19]
  • 1995: The Blues Don't Lie
  • 1996: Live at Tommy's On Main[20][21]
  • 1997: Eyes of a Woman[22]
  • 1998: Dig a Little Deeper
  • 1999: Kelly Richey Band Live
  • 2001: Sending Me Angels[23][24]
  • 2003: Kelly Richey Live...As It Should Be[25]
  • 2004: Kelly Richey Live
  • 2006: Speechless[15]
  • 2007: The Kelly Richey Band Live at the Thirsty Ear
  • 2008: Carry the Light
  • 2013: Sweet Spirit[26]
  • 2014: Live at the Blue Wisp[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b (November 20, 1998). "Energy and polish define blues-rockers", St. Petersburg Times, p. 10.
  2. ^ (December 2001). "Richey resonates in new CD", Kentucky Monthly 4 (12): 30.
  3. ^ Johnston, Katie (April 30, 1999). "Blues woman making it while remaining true to her roots", The Gazette, p. GO15.
  4. ^ Hughes, Andrew S (February 17, 2008). "Richey sees music as a light in the storm". South Bend Tribune. p. D7. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  5. ^ Johnson, Ryan (April 17, 2009). "She's got the blues - Kelly Richey Band plays Empire tonight". Grand Forks Herald. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b Hughes, Andrew S (October 2, 2011). "Richey changes her life, renews her music", South Bend Tribune, p. D2.
  7. ^ (January 29, 1999). "Kelly Richey Knows Stomping Grounds", Dayton Daily News, p. 18.
  8. ^ Hay, Lee (Jan 18, 2015). "Local blues special features Kelly Richey & Sonny Moorman!". WVXU. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  9. ^ Smith, Emmet (April 17, 2013). "Albert King: A blues guitar great who left a monumental imprint on rock 'n' roll (Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2013)". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  10. ^ Commons, Ed; Murphy, Will (September 1, 1992). "A Conversation with Kelly Richey". Ace Weekly. Lexington, Kentucky. Retrieved Sep 8, 2017. 
  11. ^ "Kelly Richey Band - a blues-based rock virtuoso". Chronicle Times. December 10, 2009. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  12. ^ Bird, Rick (May 27, 1999). "Kelly Richey: She digs a little deeper", The Cincinnati Post, p. 5.
  13. ^ a b c d e Ellis, Andy (March 2002). "Buzz". Guitar Player. pp. 57–60. Retrieved 19 October 2011. 
  14. ^ Richey, Kelly (April 23, 2016). "Lonnie Mack RIP". KellyRichey.com. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  15. ^ a b Bird, Rick (June 22, 2006). "Kelly Richey's 'Speechless' is just that". The Cincinnati Post. p. T23. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  16. ^ Baker, Brian (May 3, 2011). "Music: Kelly Richey". Cincinnati CityBeat. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  17. ^ Wedel, Mark (January 21, 2010). "Blues guitarist Kelly Richey to take hiatus after Bud Blues show". Kalamazoo Gazette. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  18. ^ Richards, Dave (September 4, 2003). "Inseparables: Kelly Richey And Her '65 Stratocaster". Erie Times-News. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  19. ^ Campbell, Michael (June 1994). "Janis, Jimi . . . and Kelly: Sister's Got A Problem". Louisville Music News. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  20. ^ Bird, Rick (July 4, 1996). "ANOTHER LIVE CD MADE AT TOMMY'S". The Cincinnati Post. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  21. ^ Willman, Alys (July 1996). "a better, more soulful Richey". Louisville Music News. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  22. ^ Bird, Rick (December 18, 1997). "THE KELLY RICHEY BAND: THROUGH THE 'EYES OF A WOMAN'". The Cincinnati Post. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  23. ^ Bird, Rick (May 17, 2001). "KELLY RICHEY FINDS 'ANGELS' ON NEW CD". The Cincinnati Post. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  24. ^ Richards, Dave (August 23, 2001). "Pleasing the Perfectionist - Kelly Richey is her own worst critic, but even she likes her new album". Erie Times-News. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  25. ^ Bird, Rick (March 27, 2003). "KELLY RICHEY CD: ROCKIN' HONESTY". The Cincinnati Post. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  26. ^ Orosz, Monica (June 6, 2013). "Clean Tone - after Years on Road, Guitarist Changes Ways". Charleston Daily Mail. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 
  27. ^ Mullins, Terry (April 14, 2014). "Featured Interview – Kelly Richey". Blues Blast Magazine. Retrieved Sep 5, 2017. 

External links[edit]