Kevin Murphy (ombudsman)

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Kevin Murphy
Picture of Kevin Murphy
Born (1937-04-09)April 9, 1937
Died (aged 75)
Dublin, Ireland
Nationality Irish
Occupation Ombudsman

Kevin Murphy (April 9, 1937 — March 5, 2012[1]) was appointed as Irish Ombudsman by the President of Ireland, Mary Robinson, upon nomination by both Houses of the Oireachtas. His term of office began November 1, 1994 and ended in 2003.[2]

Career[edit]

Murphy served as a civil servant in the Department of Industry and Commerce, in the Department of Finance, and joined the Department of the Public Service in 1973. He became Secretary-General of the latter in 1983. In 1987, he was appointed Secretary-General, Public Service Management and Development at the Department of Finance. He was appointed Ombudsman in November 1994. where he dealt with complaints against government departments, local authorities, and other public bodies. Under the terms of the Freedom of Information Act, 1997, he also held the newly created office of Information Commissioner from April 1998.[3] The Information Commissioner may review decisions of public bodies in relation to requests for access to information.

In June 2003, Emily O'Reilly succeeded him in both posts.[2] Though Murphy had been due to retire as early as 2002 when he turned 65, he has continued to serve Ireland in public life, including sitting on a committee to appoint members of the new Irish Press commission in 2006.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Murphy was educated at Synge Street CBS.[3]

He was married with four children and died 6 March 2012, aged 75.[3][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former ombudsman passionate in defence of citizens". The Irish Times. March 17, 2013. Retrieved 2015-05-03. 
  2. ^ a b Kevin Donovan (2003-03-25). "Emily O'Reilly selected as new Ombudsman". Raidió Teilifís Éireann. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  3. ^ a b c IJPP Obituaries Irish Journal of Public Policy. 2012-05-22.
  4. ^ Liam Reid (2006-12-06). "Press council: how it will be composed". Irish Times. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  5. ^ "Tribute paid to man of "immense courage"". Irish Times  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). 2012-03-06.