Laszlo Barna

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Laszlo Barna
Laszlo Barna.jpg
Canadian television producer
Born 1948
Hungary
Occupation Television Producer
Spouse(s) Laura Alper

Laszlo Barna (born 1948) is a Gemini Award-winning executive producer of television programs and films. Born in Hungary but living and working in Canada, Barna produced prominent television shows such as Da Vinci's Inquest and Blue Murder.[1]

Biography[edit]

Barna was born in Hungary and immigrated to Canada with his family in the late 1950s as a result of the Hungarian Uprising. His parents were Holocaust survivors who had been imprisoned in Auschwitz concentration camp.[2] Barna and his parents arrived in Canada at Pier 21 in Halifax, Nova Scotia. As part of a 2006 portrait photography exhibit in which Barna was featured, he stated that his parents "had suffered under both fascism and communism, and they said they were looking for a country where politicians retire rather than being executed"[3]

Barna experimented with stand-up comedy but suffered from stage fright, leading him to embark on a career as a television producer. He told the Toronto Star in 2002, "I like it behind the camera. It's safe there."[2]

By 2002 Barna's company, a partnership with his wife Laura Alper, was the most prolific producer of English-language TV programs in Canada.[2]

Awards[edit]

Barna has won several industry awards, including multiple Gemini awards for Da Vinci's Inquest as "Best Dramatic Series" (in each year 1999-2002 and again in 2004).[4] He also received the Donald Brittain Award in 2007 for the 2006 TV series Fatherland.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Barna, CBC, Campbell, Da Vinci's Inquest take hold of Gemini 16". Playback. November 12, 2001. Retrieved 14 October 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c Toohey, Tannis (October 26, 2002). "Producer works happily behind the scenes ; Laszlo Barna likes his shows, not himself, to garner attention". Toronto Star. p. J13. Retrieved 14 October 2010. 
  3. ^ Knelman, Martin (October 26, 2006). "50 portraits for 50 years Hungarians remember". Toronto Star. p. R4. Retrieved 14 October 2010. 
  4. ^ "IMDB: Awards for Laszlo Barna". Retrieved 15 October 2010.