Laurentaeglyphea

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Laurentaeglyphea neocaledonica
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Crustacea
Class: Malacostraca
Order: Decapoda
Family: Glypheidae
Genus: Laurentaeglyphea
Forest, 2006
Species: L. neocaledonica
Binomial name
Laurentaeglyphea neocaledonica
(Richer de Forges, 2006)
Synonyms[1]

Neoglyphea neocaledonica Richer de Forges, 2006

Laurentaeglyphea neocaledonica is a species of glypheoid lobster, and the only species in the genus Laurentaeglyphea. It is known from a single specimen collected on a guyot in the Coral Sea between Australia and New Caledonia. It is thought to be an active predator with colour vision, unlike its nearest living relative, Neoglyphea inopinata.

Description[edit]

Laurentaeglyphea is known from a single adult female specimen, with a carapace 26.6 by 9 millimetres (1.05 in × 0.35 in) in size.[2] In life, the animal is whitish and marked with red patches, especially on the abdomen and the distal segments of the first pereiopods; the markings are much fainter on the carapace.[2]

Laurantaeglyphea has large reniform (kidney-shaped) eyes, more developed in the lower half than the upper.[2] The epistome, behind the two pairs of antennae on the ventral side, is large, but considerably shorter than that of Neoglyphea.[2] Laurantaeglyphea has five pairs of pereiopods, all without true chelae (claws).

Distribution[edit]

The single known specimen of Laurentaeglyphea was collected at a depth of 367–536 metres (1,204–1,759 ft) on Banc Capel (Chesterfield Plateau; 24°45.70′S 159°42.13′E / 24.76167°S 159.70217°E / -24.76167; 159.70217) in the Coral Sea.[2]

Ecology[edit]

The ecology of Laurentaeglyphea is very different from that of its closest living relative, Neoglyphea inopinata.[2] Banc Capel is a guyot – a former atoll with steep sides and a flat top – and is swept by strong currents. There are no sandy or muddy substrates, the surface being occupied by rocks or gravel scree.[2] It is dominated by sponges, including the genus Phloedictyon and gorgonians. Other decapods found in the same trawls including the slipper lobster Ibacus brucei, the crab Randallia and swimming crabs.[2]

On the basis of its large eyes, Laurentaeglyphea is thought to be an active predator, perhaps one with similar hunting behaviour to that of stomatopods.[2] The presence of patterned pigmentation on an animal that lives at a depth of around 400 m (1,300 ft) suggests that it does not live in a burrow.[2] In the clear waters of the Coral Sea, sufficient light penetrates to these depths for a wide range of colours to be represented among the fauna.[2] The eyes of Laurentaeglyphea are thought to be adapted to colour vision, even if it is biased towards the shorter wavelengths (blues and greens).[2]

The collected specimen of Laurentaeglyphea was observed to be very active and aggressive, using its semichelate first pereiopods to attack.[2]

Taxonomy[edit]

Laurentaeglyphea neocaledonica was originally described by Bertrand Richer de Forges in 2006, on the basis of a single specimen (the holotype).[2] He named the species Neoglyphea neocaledonica, where the specific epithet neocaledonica refers to New Caledonia, the nearest land to the site where the holotype was collected.[2] Later that year, Jacques Forest erected the new genus Laurentaeglyphea for the new species, separating it from Neoglyphea inopinata, the only other species in the genus Neoglyphea.[Note 1] The genus name Laurentaeglyphea commemorates Michèle de Saint Laurent, who had discovered and co-described the first Recent specimen of the infraorder Glypheidea.[3]

The two species of living glypheids are considered "living fossils".[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although Forest had intended to publish the new genus name in an article in Comptes Rendus Biologies,[3] companion papers in the journal Crustaceana had actually appeared first,[4][5] where the name appeared without any description or diagnosis (i.e. as a nomen nudum).[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b T. Y. Chan; M. Butler; A. MacDiarmid; A. Cockcroft & R. Wahle (2011). "Laurentaeglyphea neocaledonica". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2011: e.T185043A8357202. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2011-1.RLTS.T185043A8357202.en. Retrieved 8 January 2018. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Bertrand Richer de Forges (2006). "Découverte en mer du Corail d'une deuxième espèce de glyphéide (Crustacea, Decapoda, Glypheoidea)" (PDF). Zoosystema. 28 (1): 17–28. 
  3. ^ a b Jacques Forest (2006). "Laurentaeglyphea, un nouveau genre pour la seconde espèce de Glyphéide récemment découverte (Crustacea Decapoda Glypheidae)". Comptes Rendus Biologies. 329 (10): 841–846. doi:10.1016/j.crvi.2006.08.003. PMID 17027644. 
  4. ^ Jacques Forest (2006). "Les glyphéides actuels et leur relation avec les formes fossiles (Decapoda, Reptantia)" [The Recent glypheids and their relationship with their fossil relatives (Decapoda, Reptantia)] (PDF). Crustaceana (in French). 79 (7): 769–793. doi:10.1163/156854006778008212. 
  5. ^ Jacques Forest (2006). "The Recent glypheids and their relationship with their fossil relatives (Decapoda, Reptantia)". Crustaceana. 79 (7): 795–820. doi:10.1163/156854006778008221. 
  6. ^ Christopher B. Boyko (2006). "Laurentaeglyphea Forest, 2006 (Crustacea, Decapoda, Glypheidae): a cautionary tale of nomina nuda and the unpredictability of publication schedules" (PDF). Zootaxa. 1914: 62–64. 
  7. ^ Marie-Catherine Boisselier-Dubayle; Céline Bonillo; Corinne Cruaud; Arnaud Couloux; Bertrand Richer de Forges; Nicolas Vidal (2010). "The phylogenetic position of the 'living fossils' Neoglyphea and Laurentaeglyphea (Decapoda: Glypheidea)". Comptes Rendus Biologies. 333 (10): 755–759. doi:10.1016/j.crvi.2010.08.007. PMID 20965445.