Lawrence Kermit White

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Lawrence Kermit White
CIA-pg29-lawrence-k-red-white.png
Lawrence "Red" White
Nickname(s) "Red"
Born (1912-06-10)June 10, 1912
Tennessee
Died April 5, 2006(2006-04-05) (aged 93)
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1929 - 1947
Rank Colonel
Battles/wars World War II
Awards Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Legions of Merit (2), Bronze Star (3)
Other work Deputy Director, Central Intelligence Agency. Codename "Blue"

Colonel Lawrence Kermit "Red" White (June 10, 1912 – April 5, 2006)[1] was an American army officer during World War II and later Director of the Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Deputy Director for Administration and Executive Director for the Central Intelligence Agency.

Biography[edit]

White was the son of a Presbyterian minister in Tennessee, he earned money digging ditches at aged 16, before graduating from Troy High School in 1929 and was accepted at the United States Military Academy at West Point on 1 July 1929 with help from congressman Jerry Cooper.[2] In September 1942 White was sent to serve in the Pacific theater of the Second World War, seeing combat in New Georgia, Bougainville and the Philippines. White earned a Distinguished Service Cross, a Silver Star, two Legions of Merit, and three Bronze Stars. Reaching the rank of colonel in the Philippines in 1945,[3] he was severely wounded and had to be dragged to safety while under fire by US Army Chaplain Elmer Heindl. From 1945 until 1947 White recuperated in a number of US veterans hospitals.

After release, White joined the CIA in the Office of Operations, becoming head of the Foreign Broadcast Information Branch and by December 1950 Deputy Assistant Director of the Office of Operations. He was promoted again to Assistant to the Deputy Director for Administration in 1952 and to Deputy Director for Administration in 1954 by DCI Allen Dulles. In 1964, DCI William Raborn made White Executive Director-Comptroller until his retirement in 1972.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "NNDB profile". 
  2. ^ a b "An Interview With Former CIA Executive Director Lawrence K. "Red" White". CIA. Retrieved June 22, 2007. 
  3. ^ "Burning City". TIME Magazine. February 19, 1945. Retrieved June 22, 2007.