Leonard C. Ward

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Leonard C. Ward
Leonard C. Ward.jpg
Brigadier General Leonard C. Ward as Chief of the Army Division, National Guard Bureau, c. 1969
Born (1917-11-17)November 17, 1917
Virginia, Minnesota
Died March 20, 2001(2001-03-20) (aged 83)
Washington, D.C.
Buried Arlington National Cemetery
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1939–1972
Rank Brigadier General
Unit Michigan Army National Guard
Army National Guard
Commands held 107th Engineer Battalion
46th Infantry Division
Army National Guard
Battles/wars World War II
Awards Legion of Merit
Bronze Star Medal
Other work Information Management Consultant, Computer Sciences Corporation

Brigadier General Leonard C. Ward (November 17, 1917 – March 20, 2001) was a United States Army officer who served as Chief of the Army Division (now Director of the Army National Guard) at the National Guard Bureau.

Early life[edit]

Leonard Cecil Ward was born in Virginia, Minnesota on November 17, 1917, and was raised in Minnesota, Oklahoma and Michigan.[1][2][3] He graduated from the Michigan College of Mining and Technology (now Michigan Technological University) in 1939 with a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering, received his commission as a Second Lieutenant of Engineers from the Reserve Officer Training Corps, and joined the Michigan Army National Guard. Ward later earned a Master of Science degree in Information Systems Technology from George Washington University.

World War II[edit]

Ward settled first in Ishpeming and later East Lansing, and entered active duty with the 32nd Infantry Division in 1940. He served in the European Theater during World War II, first as a platoon leader and company commander in the 107th Engineer Battalion, and later on the staff of the 1121st Engineer Combat Group, both units that were part of the V Corps.[4]

Post World War II[edit]

He continued his military service after the war, and graduated from the United States Army Command and General Staff College in 1948.[5] He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in 1951, and from 1952 to 1957 he was Commander of the 107th Engineer Battalion.[6]

In 1957 Ward was appointed Engineer Staff Officer for the 46th Infantry Division, and in 1959 he was named Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (G3).[7][8]

In 1962 Ward was promoted to Colonel and assigned as the National Guard representative on the Army Staff at the Pentagon. He served until 1967, when he was assigned as Assistant Division Commander of the 46th Infantry Division and promoted to Brigadier General.[9] He also served as the final Commander of the 46th Division before it was deactivated in 1968.[10][11]

National Guard Bureau[edit]

In 1968 Ward was assigned to the National Guard Bureau as Chief of the Army Division, succeeding Charles L. Southward.[12] In 1970 this position was upgraded to a Major General’s assignment with the title Director of the Army National Guard. The Director of the Army National Guard was authorized a Brigadier General as a Deputy, and Ward was appointed Deputy Director of the Army National Guard, serving until his 1972 retirement.[13] He was succeeded by Joseph R. Jelinek.

Post military career[edit]

After retiring from the military, Ward was employed by Computer Sciences Corporation, providing Information Management consulting services to the military, government and corporate clients.[14]

Awards and decorations[edit]

Ward’s awards included: Legion of Merit; Bronze Star Medal with oak leaf cluster; American Defense Service Medal; European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with Arrowhead device and five Battle Stars; World War II Victory Medal; Armed Forces Reserve Medal; Michigan Distinguished Service Medal; and Michigan Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters.[15]

Death and burial[edit]

In retirement Ward resided in McLean, Virginia.[16] He died at Walter Reed Army Medical Center on March 20, 2001[17] and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Section 48, Grave 1974.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1920 U.S. Census, entry for James G. Ward family
  2. ^ 1930 U.S. Census, entry for James G. Ward family
  3. ^ 1940 U.S. Census, entry for James G. Ward family
  4. ^ U.S. House Appropriations Committee, Hearing Record, Additional Items for Defense Agencies, Biographical sketch, Leonard C. Ward, 1970, page 843
  5. ^ National Guard Bureau, Official National Guard Register, 1953, page 1168
  6. ^ State of Michigan, Michigan Manual, 1957, page 233
  7. ^ State of Michigan, Michigan Manual, 1961, page 230
  8. ^ National Guard Association of the United States, The National Guardsman, Volume 16, 1962, page 49
  9. ^ United Press International, Traverse City Record Eagle, New Deputy CO of Guard Division, February 16, 1967
  10. ^ United Press International, Traverse City Record Eagle, Guard Assemblies, July 15, 1967
  11. ^ United Press International, Traverse City Record Eagle, State Guard Reorganizes, January 31, 1968
  12. ^ United Press International, Holland Evening Sentinel, Guard Names Assistant, January 17, 1968
  13. ^ National Guard Association of the United States, The National Guardsman, Jelinek Named ARNG Director, Volumes 26-27, 1972, page 40
  14. ^ Washington Post, Obituary, Leonard C. Ward, March 27, 2001
  15. ^ Marquette County, Michigan Obituary Collection, Obituary, Leonard C. Ward, June 15, 2011
  16. ^ Social Security Death Index, entry for Leonard C. Ward, accessed May 21, 2013
  17. ^ Washington Post, Obituary, Leonard C. Ward, March 27, 2001
  18. ^ Leonard C. Ward entry at Arlington National Cemetery, accessed May 21, 2013

External links[edit]