List of musical pieces which use extended techniques

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This is a list of musical compositions that employ extended techniques to obtain unusual sounds or instrumental timbres.

"Dream of Witches' Sabbath" from Symphonie Fantastique. The violins and violas play col legno, striking the wood of their bows on the strings (Berlioz 1899, 220–22).
Battalia (1673). The strings play col legno, striking the wood of their bows on the strings, in addition to numerous other techniques (Boyden 2001).
Le calife de Bagdad (opera, 1800), strings play col legno (Favre and Betzwieser 2001).
Passacaglia from Peter Grimes, rehearsal 6, "agitato", (pp. 16–17 of the score). The violins and violas play col legno, striking the wood of their bows on the strings (Britten 1945, 16–17).
La espiral eterna for Guitar.[citation needed]
prepared piano pieces (1938)
All works make extensive use of extended techniques.[citation needed]
Une heure de mariage (opera, 1804). Strings use col legno (Charlton 2001).
Watt, concerto for trombone and orchestra (1994). Features "ample use of extended techniques" (Pace 1997, 19).
Concert Music for Solo Clarinet (1960) makes use of many extended clarinet techniques, including multiphonics, alternate fingerings, and extremely high pitches.[citation needed]
Capriccio stravagante (from Ander Theil newer Paduanen, Gagliarden, Couranten, französischen Arien, 1627). The violins play glissando, pizzicato, tremolo, and in double stops, and use particular effects such as col legno (striking the wood of the bow on the strings) and sul ponticello (bowing close to the bridge), in order to imitate the sounds of a cat, a dog, a hen, the lyre, clarino trumpet, military drum, Spanish guitar, etc. (Boyden 2001; Pyron and Bianco 2001).
Concord Sonata, use of a 1434 inch long piece of wood to create a cluster chord in the "Hawthorne" movement (Bruh 2011, 179).
All works make extensive use of extended techniques.
Symphony No. 1 in D major, third movement (p. 91 of the UE score) first violins, divisi a 3, play col legno tratto, stroking the strings with the wood of their bows (Piston 1955, 22).
Symphony No. 2 in D major, first movement, b. 304–306, all the strings play col legno (some of the strings continue through 307), striking the wood of their bows on the strings (Marsh and Marsh 2016).
All works make extensive use of extended techniques.[citation needed]
Danse macabre, the strings play col legno to suggest the rattling of skeletons (Latham 2002)
Gurrelieder (1911), makes use of Sprechstimme (Kennedy 2006)
Die glückliche Hand (1910–13), makes use of Sprechstimme (Kennedy 2006)
Pierrot Lunaire Op. 21 (1912) makes use of Sprechstimme (Kennedy 2006)
Moses und Aron (1930–32), makes use of Sprechstimme (Kennedy 2006)
String Quartet No. 4, op. 37 (1936). Fourth movement (Allegro), b. 882–88, all four instruments play col legno battuto, col legno tratto, and col legno tratto ponticello, on single notes and in double stops, trmolo, and in harmonics (Schoenberg 1939, 101–102).
String Trio, op. 45 (1946). The violin and cello play col legno battuto; the violin plays col legno tratto in double stops; all the instruments play col legno tratto ponticello, double stops; violin and viola play col legno tratto ponticello in double stops, which are also played tremolo (Boyden 2001; Schoenberg 1950, 1–5, 14, 18–19)
All works make extensive use of extended techniques.[citation needed]
The Firebird, the strings occasionally play col legno, striking the wood of their bows on the strings (Stravinsky 1964, 11, 40–43, 94–96, 102–103, 161–62)
Voice' for solo flute[citation needed]
Assobio a játo (1950), requires the flute to play "imitando fischi in toni ascendenti" (imitating whistles in rising tones), accomplished by blowing into the embouchure fff "as if one were warming up the instrument on a cold day" (Villa-Lobos 1953, 12, and an instruction slip inserted in the score).
Chôros no. 8 (1925), for orchestra and two pianos, requires one or both of the pianos to insert paper between the strings for a passage (Villa-Lobos 1928, 109–16).
  • Kevin Volans String quartets like "White Man Sleeps" uses many extended techniques, both compositional and instrumental.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  • Berlioz, Hector. 1899. Episode de la vie d'un artiste: Symphonie fantastique en 5 parties, op. 14. Eulenburgs kleine Partitur-Ausgabe Nr. 422. Leipzig: Ernst Eulenburg.
  • Boyden, David D. 2001. "Col legno". The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell. London: Macmillan Publishers.
  • Britten, Benjamin. 1945. Passacaglia, op. 33b, from the Opera Peter Grimes. Hawkes Pocket Scores no. 84. London: Boosey & Hawkes.
  • Bruh, Christopher. 2011. "The Transitive Multiverse of Charles Ives's 'Concord' Sonata". The Journal of Musicology 28, no. 2 (Spring): 166–94.
  • Charlton, David. 2001. "Dalayrac [D’Alayrac], Nicolas-Marie". The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell. London: Macmillan Publishers.
  • Favre, Georges, and Thomas Betzwieser. 2001. "Boieldieu, (François-)Adrien". The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell. London: Macmillan Publishers.
  • Kennedy, Michael. 2006. "Sprechgesang, Sprechstimme". The Oxford Dictionary of Music, second edition, Joyce Bourne, associate editor. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Latham, Alison (ed.). 2002. “Col legno”, in Oxford Companion to Music. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Marsh, Gregory and Elizabeth. 2016. "Col Legno". The Classy Musician Blog (19 April; accessed 19 April 2016).[unreliable source?]
  • Morrow, Michael, and Colette Harris. 2001. "Hume, Tobias". The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell. London: Macmillan Publishers.
  • Pace, Ian. 1997. "Never to Be Naught". The Musical Times 138, no. 1857 (November): 17–20.
  • Piston, Walter. 1955. Orchestration. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.
  • Pyron, Nona, and Aurelio Bianco. 2001. "Farina, Carlo". The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell. London: Macmillan Publishers.
  • Schoenberg, Arnold. 1939. Fourth String Quartet, Op. 37. G. Schirmer’s Edition of Study Scores of Orchestral Works and Chamber Music, no. 21. New York and London: G. Schirmer.
  • Schoenberg, Arnold. 1950. String Trio, Op. 45. Hillsdale, New York: Boelke-Bomart Publications.
  • Stravinsky, Igor. 1964. Zhar-ptitsa [The Firebird], Moscow: Gos. muzykal’noe izd-vo.
  • Traficante, Frank. 2001. "Lyra [leero, leerow, liera, lyro] viol". The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, second edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrrell. London: Macmillan Publishers.
  • Villa-Lobos, Heitor. 1928. Chôros (No 8) pour orchestre. Paris: Éditions Max Eschig.
  • Villa-Lobos, Heitor. 1953. Assobio a játo (The Jet Whistle). New York: Southern Music Publishing Company, Inc.

External links[edit]