Listed buildings in Farndon, Cheshire

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Farndon is a civil parish in Cheshire West and Chester, England. It contains 19 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. One of these is listed at Grade I, the highest grade, three at the middle grade, Grade II*, and the rest at the lowest grade, Grade II. Apart from the village of Farndon, the parish is rural. The listed buildings include houses in the village, the church and tombs in the churchyard, the ancient bridge crossing the River Dee, the former village lock-up, and a memorial.

Key[edit]

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Grade Criteria[1]
I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Farndon Bridge
53°05′01″N 2°52′47″W / 53.08365°N 2.87972°W / 53.08365; -2.87972 (Farndon Bridge)
Farndon bridge.jpg
1339 The road bridge crosses the River Dee between the villages of Farndon and Holt, and is partly in Wales. It is constructed in sandstone, and consists of eight arches, five of which are cross the river. The bridge is also a scheduled monument.[2][3][4][5] I
St Chad's Church
53°05′02″N 2°52′39″W / 53.0840°N 2.8774°W / 53.0840; -2.8774 (St Chad's Church)
St. Chads, Fandon.JPG
14th century The oldest fabric in the church is in the lower part of the tower. The church was badly damaged in the Civil War, following which it was largely rebuilt in 1658. It was restored in the 19th century. The church is constructed in sandstone with slate roofs, and consists of a nave, a chancel, a north porch, a south vestry, and a west tower.[6][7][8] II*
The Chimes
53°05′05″N 2°52′43″W / 53.08460°N 2.87863°W / 53.08460; -2.87863 (The Chimes)
17th century A timber-framed cottage with brick nogging and a slate roof. It is in ​1 12 storeys, and has casement windows and two gabled dormers.[9] II
Tudor
53°05′05″N 2°52′44″W / 53.08467°N 2.87875°W / 53.08467; -2.87875 (Tudor)
17th century A timber-framed cottage with brick nogging. It is in ​1 12 storeys, and has casement windows. On the front are three gabled dormers.[10] II
Chapel House
53°05′06″N 2°52′39″W / 53.08509°N 2.87748°W / 53.08509; -2.87748 (Chapel House)
Mid 17th century A former chapel and house, later converted into a house, built in brick on a sandstone plinth, with a slate roof. It has two storeys and an attic, with a shaped gable facing the road. It has a stone doorway with a semi-circular head. Between the ground and first floor is a brick dentil band. There is a small round window in the gable.[11][12] II
Top Farm
53°05′06″N 2°52′33″W / 53.0849°N 2.8757°W / 53.0849; -2.8757 (Top Farm)
Mid 17th century The former farmhouse is in brick on a stone plinth with slate roofs. It consists of a central block with two cross wings. The central block and the right wing has two storeys; the left wing has three storeys and shaped gable s on the front and the back. The windows are a mix of sashes and casements. Inside is an inglenook.[11][13] II
Holly Bank
53°05′02″N 2°52′30″W / 53.0838°N 2.8751°W / 53.0838; -2.8751 (Holly Bank)
Late 17th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is symmetrical, and in three storeys. The windows are sashes. Inside the house is an inglenook and oak panelling.[14] II*
Black and White Cottages
53°05′03″N 2°52′30″W / 53.08424°N 2.87504°W / 53.08424; -2.87504 (Black and White Cottages)
Late 17th century (probable) A row of three timber-framed cottages with brick nogging and thatched roofs. They are in one storey with an attic, and each cottage has a gabled eyebrow dormer. All the windows are casements. Parts of the timber-framing have been replaced with brick.[15] II
Table tombs,
St Chad's Churchyard
53°05′04″N 2°52′38″W / 53.08445°N 2.87729°W / 53.08445; -2.87729 (Table tombs)
Early 18th century A pair of adjacent table tombs in yellow sandstone. The inscriptions are weathered, and the carvings include an hourglass and a skull and crossbones.[16] II
Academy House
53°05′06″N 2°52′38″W / 53.08513°N 2.87718°W / 53.08513; -2.87718 (Academy House)
Late 18th century The house contains features from an earlier date, and at one time housed a school. It is built in brick with a slate roof, and has rusticated quoins. It has three storeys, and is in three bays, the central bay projecting slightly. The windows are sashes. Inside the house is an inglenook.[17] II
Holly Bush Cottage
53°05′30″N 2°52′35″W / 53.09165°N 2.87648°W / 53.09165; -2.87648 (Holly Bush Cottage)
c. 1820 A sandstone cottage with a slate roof in Tudor Revival style. It consists of a main wing and a cross wing, and is in ​1 12 storeys. The cottage has casement windows, and a Tudor-arched doorway. The gables are coped with stone finials. The rear of the cottage is pebbledashed.[18] II
Church View
53°05′07″N 2°52′38″W / 53.08536°N 2.87732°W / 53.08536; -2.87732 (Church View)
Early 19th century A brick house with a slate roof, forming part of a row. It has three storeys, each storey having sash windows with stone wedge lintels. The chimney is on the gable.[19] II
Holly Cottage
53°05′00″N 2°52′22″W / 53.08328°N 2.87272°W / 53.08328; -2.87272 (Holly Cottage)
Early 19th century A brick house with a slate roof. It is almost symmetrical, with two storeys, and four windows in each storey. The inner windows are sashes, and the outer windows are replaced casements, all under painted stone wedge lintels and with cills. In the left gable wall is a 20th-century oriel window.[20] II
Poplar House
53°05′07″N 2°52′36″W / 53.08530°N 2.87677°W / 53.08530; -2.87677 (Poplar House)
Early 19th century A brick house with a slate roof, attached to a cartshed and a stable. The house is in two storeys, and has an open gabled porch. The windows are sashes under rusticated keystone lintels. The former cartshed and stable are attached to the right side of the house and contain an arched entrance, above which is a door to the hayloft.[21] II
Sunnyside
53°05′07″N 2°52′38″W / 53.08536°N 2.87721°W / 53.08536; -2.87721 (Sunnyside)
Early 19th century A brick house with a slate roof on a plaster cornice. It has three storeys, and is in ​1 12 bays. One of the windows in the top floor, and the window by the door, are casements; the other windows are sashes with stone wedge lintels with cills.[22] II
Deebanks
53°05′05″N 2°52′49″W / 53.0846°N 2.8802°W / 53.0846; -2.8802 (Deebanks)
1830s (probable) A pebbledashed house with a hipped slate roof, later divided into two houses. The main block has a symmetrical front, with a Doric doorway, above which is a bow window. To each side of the doorway is a single-storey canted bay window; the other windows are sashes. In the left wing the windows are in Gothick style.[23] II
Village lock-up
53°05′05″N 2°52′33″W / 53.08469°N 2.87592°W / 53.08469; -2.87592 (Village lock-up)
1837 The village lock-up is constructed in brick and has a pyramidal slate roof. There are two barred semi-circular openings with stone surrounds. The original doorway has been replaced. Between the openings is an inscription, including the date.[24] II
Barnston Memorial
53°05′26″N 2°52′37″W / 53.09054°N 2.87705°W / 53.09054; -2.87705 (Barnston Memorial)
Barnston Monument, Farndon.jpg
1858 The memorial, designed by E. A. Heffer, is to the memory of Major Barnston, who was killed in the Crimean War. It consists of a slim yellow sandstone obelisk, surrounded by cast iron railings. It is flanked by four crouching lions, and carries a plaque inscribed with details of his service and death.[2][25] II*
War memorial
53°05′04″N 2°52′39″W / 53.08448°N 2.87741°W / 53.08448; -2.87741 (Village lock-up)
1919 The war memorial is in limestone and consists of a Celtic-style wheel-head cross about 5 metres (16 ft) high. It has a tapering chamfered shaft on a rectangular plinth itself on a three-stepped chamfered base. The head is decorated with interlace detailing in relief. On the base is an inscription, and the names of those lost in both World Wars are inscribed on the plinth.[26] II

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 1 April 2015 
  2. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 359
  3. ^ Ward, S. S, "A Survey of Holt-Farndon Medieval Bridge", Cheshire Past, Chester Archaeological Service, pp. 14–15, retrieved 29 March 2008 
  4. ^ Historic England, "Farndon Bridge (that part in Cheshire, a scheduled Ancient Monument) (1279428)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 June 2013 
  5. ^ Historic England, "Farndon Holt Bridge (1006758)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 June 2013 
  6. ^ Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 358–359
  7. ^ St Chad's, Farndon: History, St Chad's Church, Farndon, retrieved 25 June 2013 
  8. ^ Historic England, "Church of St Chad, Farndon (1279424)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 June 2013 
  9. ^ Historic England, "The Chimes, Farndon (1228883)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  10. ^ Historic England, "Tudor, Farndon (1228745)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 June 2013 
  11. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 358
  12. ^ Historic England, "Chapel House, Farndon (1228747)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  13. ^ Historic England, "Top Farm, Farndon (1229034)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  14. ^ Historic England, "Holly Bank, formerly The Doctor's House, Farndon (1228744)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 June 2013 
  15. ^ Historic England, "Black and White Cottages, Farndon (1279427)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  16. ^ Historic England, "Pair of adjacent Table Tombs in Churchyard (south of St Chad's Church, east of path to Church Porch), Farndon (1228746)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 June 2013 
  17. ^ Historic England, "Academy House, Farndon (1229046)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  18. ^ Historic England, "Holly Bush Cottage, Farndon (1228748)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  19. ^ Historic England, "Church View, Farndon (1228749)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  20. ^ Historic England, "Holly Cottage, Farndon (1228877)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  21. ^ Historic England, "Poplar House, with former cartshed and stable, Farndon (1228750)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  22. ^ Historic England, "Sunnyside, Farndon (1229008)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  23. ^ Historic England, "Deebanks, Farndon (1279426)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  24. ^ Historic England, "Village lockup, Farndon (1228751)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 26 June 2013 
  25. ^ Historic England, "Barnston Memorial, Farndon (1279425)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 June 2013 
  26. ^ Historic England, "Farndon War Memorial (1438604)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 October 2016 

Sources