Listed buildings in Whitegate and Marton

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Whitegate and Marton is a civil parish in Cheshire West and Chester, England. It contains 33 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. One of these, Vale Royal Abbey is listed at Grade II*, and the others are at Grade II. The parish is almost entirely rural, and most of the listed buildings are domestic or related to farming. The older houses and cottages are frequently wholly or partly timber-framed. The River Weaver and the Weaver Navigation run through the parish, and some of the listed structures are related to these waterways. Other listed buildings in the parish include ancient stones, monuments, structures related to Vale Royal Abbey, and St Mary's Church, Whitegate, its gatepiers, and its lychgate.

Key[edit]

Grade Criteria[1]
Grade II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
Grade II Buildings of national importance and special interest.

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Vale Royal Abbey
53°13′29″N 2°32′33″W / 53.2247°N 2.5426°W / 53.2247; -2.5426 (Vale Royal Abbey)
Vale royal abbey.jpg
1277 Once the largest Cistercian abbey in England, much of it was demolished after the Dissolution of the Monasteries when it was converted into a house. The building was extended from 1833 by Edward Blore, and more work was carried out from 1860 by John Douglas. It has since been converted partly into a golf club house, and partly into apartments. The land on which the abbey stood is a scheduled monument.[2][3][4] II*
Long stone
53°12′17″N 2°36′59″W / 53.20466°N 2.61639°W / 53.20466; -2.61639 (Long stone)
Longstone.jpg
Medieval This consists of a fragment of a wayside cross shaft in red sandstone ashlar. It stands on a modern base consisting of three stones set on a concrete plinth. It is also a scheduled monument.[5][6] II
Plague stone
53°12′21″N 2°37′19″W / 53.20593°N 2.62204°W / 53.20593; -2.62204 (Plague stone)
Late medieval (probable) This consists of a square piece of sandstone with a hollowed top mounted on an 19th-century sandstone plinth with chamfered edges.[7] II
St Mary's Church
53°13′12″N 2°33′26″W / 53.2199°N 2.5571°W / 53.2199; -2.5571 (St Mary's Church)
St Mary's Church, Whitegate2.jpg
15th century The church was refaced in 1728, when the tower was built. In 1874–75 John Douglas largely rebuilt the church at the expense of Lord Delamere, retaining medieval features, including the octagonal timber nave piers. It is constructed in brick with a tiled roof. At the west end is a tower with a broach spire.[8][9] II
Beeches Cottage
53°12′44″N 2°34′07″W / 53.2123°N 2.5685°W / 53.2123; -2.5685 (Beeches Cottage)
1600 A single-storey timber-framed cottage with whitewashed brick infill and a tiled roof. To the right of centre is a 19th-century porch. This has red sandstone lower walls, a timber upper part, and a gable with bargeboards. The windows are casements.[10] II
Vale View Cottages
53°12′22″N 2°35′12″W / 53.2062°N 2.5868°W / 53.2062; -2.5868 (Vale View Cottages)
Early 17th century Two separate cottages, subsequently altered and expanded. The older one is smaller, consisting of a single bay; the other cottage has three bays. They are built in brick with some timber framing, and have thatched roofs. They are in one storey with an attic.[11] II
Bradford Mill House
53°12′48″N 2°31′49″W / 53.2133°N 2.5302°W / 53.2133; -2.5302 (Bradford Mill House)
Early 17th century A timber-framed farmhouse with whitewashed brick infill on a stone plinth, and with a tiled roof. Additions and alterations were made in the 19th and 20th centuries. It is in two storeys. Some of the windows are mullioned, and others are casements.[12] II
Old Post Office
53°12′53″N 2°33′53″W / 53.2147°N 2.5646°W / 53.2147; -2.5646 (Old Post Office)
The old post office - geograph.org.uk - 993917.jpg
17th century This is a house constructed partly in brick and partly timber-framed with brick infill. The roof is thatched. It is in two storeys, with a two-bay entrance front. At the rear is an extension in painted sandstone. Inside the house is an inglenook.[13] II
Foxes Green Farmhouse
53°12′44″N 2°33′43″W / 53.2121°N 2.5620°W / 53.2121; -2.5620 (Foxes Green Farmhouse)
Mid to late 17th century A timber-framed farmhouse with brick and wattle and daub infill standing on a stone plinth. Its roof was originally thatched, and was later covered by asbestos sheeting. All the windows date from the 19th century.[14] II
Keepers Cottage
53°13′24″N 2°34′14″W / 53.2232°N 2.5706°W / 53.2232; -2.5706 (Keepers Cottage)
Mid to late 17th century A timber-framed cottage with whitewashed brick infill and a slate roof. It is in two storeys and contains casement windows. To the left is a 19th-century extension in brick painted to appear like timber framing, and a 19th-century lean-to addition on the right.[15] II
Rookery Cottage and Swan Cottage
53°12′11″N 2°35′35″W / 53.2030°N 2.5930°W / 53.2030; -2.5930 (Rookery Cottage and Swan Cottage)
Mid to late 17th century A pair of timber-framed cottages with rendered infill standing on a stone plinth. They are in two storeys, and have slate roofs. The windows in the upper storey are two-light gabled half-dormers. There have been additions and alterations during the 20th century.[16] II
Briary Farmhouse
53°12′42″N 2°34′04″W / 53.2116°N 2.5678°W / 53.2116; -2.5678 (Briary Farmhouse)
Late 17th century A timber-framed farmhouse with whitewashed infill and a slate roof. The house is in two storeys, and has casement windows, one of which is in a dormer. On the left is a 19th-century lean-to.[17] II
Falcon Cottage and adjacent cottage
53°12′21″N 2°33′54″W / 53.2059°N 2.5650°W / 53.2059; -2.5650 (Falcon Cottage and adjacent cottage)
Late 17th century Two adjacent houses, timber-framed with rendered infill. The roofs are thatched. The houses are in two storeys. In the lower storey are casement windows; in the upper storeys are dormers, also containing casements.[18] II
Rivendell
53°12′46″N 2°34′13″W / 53.2127°N 2.5703°W / 53.2127; -2.5703 (Rivendell)
Late 17th century A timber-framed farmhouse with rendered infill and a thatched roof in two storeys. To the right is a single-storey later extension, and to the left is a two-storey extension, both of which are also timber-framed. The ground floor has casement windows, and in the upper storey are dormers.[19] II
Rookery Cottage
53°13′09″N 2°34′44″W / 53.2193°N 2.5789°W / 53.2193; -2.5789 (Rookery Cottage)
Late 17th century A timber-framed cottage with brick infill and a tiled roof in two storeys. The lower floor contains casement windows, the upper floor has dormers. To the left is a later extension in brick painted to appear like timber framing. To the right is a 20th-century extension.[20] II
Whitegate Cottage
53°13′08″N 2°33′26″W / 53.2190°N 2.5572°W / 53.2190; -2.5572 (Whitegate Cottage)
Thatched cottage, Whitegate, Cheshire - geograph.org.uk - 192600.jpg
Late 17th century This is partly timber-framed with brick infill, and partly in whitewashed brick. It has a thatched roof, and is in two storeys. On the street front are two doorways. In the ground floor are casement windows, and in the upper storey there are dormers.[21][22] II
Whitegate House
53°13′09″N 2°33′25″W / 53.2192°N 2.5570°W / 53.2192; -2.5570 (Whitegate House)
Early 18th century Built in rendered brick with a slate roof, the house is in two storeys with an attic. The entrance front is symmetrical, in three bays. In the centre is a gabled wooden porch, with a canted bay window in each side. The lateral bays have gables with bargeboards. The windows are casements.[23] II
Gatepiers,
St Mary's Church
53°13′11″N 2°33′26″W / 53.21960°N 2.5572°W / 53.21960; -2.5572 (Gatepiers, St Mary's Churchyard)
Steps and gate to St mary's Church - geograph.org.uk - 994110.jpg
1736 The pair of gatepiers flank the drive in the churchyard of St Mary's. They are square, decorated with panels, and surmounted by cyma caps with finials consisting of ogee shaped stems holding large balls.[24] II
Monkey Lodge
53°13′35″N 2°33′40″W / 53.2263°N 2.5612°W / 53.2263; -2.5612 (Monkey Lodge)
Mid to late 18th century A two-storey brick house with a slate roof, extended in 1814. Its exterior is decorated with plaster panels, including one depicting a monkey playing a horn. The windows are casements.[25] II
Sandiway Bank Farmhouse
53°14′11″N 2°33′58″W / 53.2365°N 2.5662°W / 53.2365; -2.5662 (Sandiway Bank Farmhouse)
Late 18th century A two-storey brick farmhouse with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has a symmetrical three-bay front and sash windows. The doorcase has an open triangular pediment and a fanlight. In the gable ends are lunettes.[26] II
Abottsmoss Hall
53°12′33″N 2°36′43″W / 53.2093°N 2.6120°W / 53.2093; -2.6120 (Abottsmoss Hall)
c. 1800 A country house constructed in red brick with ashlar dressings and a slate roof. It is in two storeys, and has an entrance front of nine bays. The house has pilaster buttresses and sash windows. On the left side are two canted bow windows.[27] II
Bark House Farmhouse
53°12′53″N 2°32′50″W / 53.2147°N 2.5472°W / 53.2147; -2.5472 (Bark House Farmhouse)
Early 19th century This is a brick farmhouse with a slate roof. It is in three storeys and a basement. The entrance front is symmetrical with three bays and a central doorway. The rear is in five bays, and is almost symmetrical with a doorway to the right of centre. To the right of the house is a 19th-century two-storey addition.[28] II
Stable block,
Vale Royal Abbey
53°13′25″N 2°32′38″W / 53.2237°N 2.5438°W / 53.2237; -2.5438 (Stable block, Vale Royal Abbey)
1828 The former stable block has been converted into apartments. It is constructed in red sandstone and whitewashed brick and has a slate roof. The building is in two storeys, with an entrance front of seven bays. There are gables, some of which are shaped.[29][30] II
Marton House Farmhouse
53°11′41″N 2°33′51″W / 53.1947°N 2.5642°W / 53.1947; -2.5642 (Marton House Farmhouse)
Early to mid 19th century A brick farmhouse with ashlar dressings standing on an ashlar plinth. The house has a hipped slate roof, and a symmetrical entrance front of three bays. It has a projecting central porch with a battlemented parapet. The windows are casements. On each side is a single-storey wing, each of which has a battlemented parapet.[31] II
Nun's Grave Cross
53°13′30″N 2°32′29″W / 53.22495°N 2.54135°W / 53.22495; -2.54135 (Nun's Grave Cross)
19th century This consists of a cross, a shaft, and a base that was assembled in the 19th century from sandstone taken from the demolished Vale Royal Abbey. The base is probably from the 14th century, the shaft from the 17th century, and the top from the 15th century. The cross head has niches containing statues of the Crucifixion and saints. It is decorated with crockets.[32] II
Monument,
Monk's Well Cottage
53°13′26″N 2°32′23″W / 53.2238°N 2.5398°W / 53.2238; -2.5398 (Monument)
1852 The monument to Lady Delamere is an octagonal sandstone structure under an octagonal canopy with a cross on the apex of its roof. It has an inscribed parapet and a copper plaque, also bearing an inscription. The monument has a stepped surround and a wall with low piers.[33] II
Sluice channel and swing bridge
53°13′44″N 2°32′26″W / 53.22884°N 2.54069°W / 53.22884; -2.54069 (Sluice channel and swing bridge)
Vale Royal Locks Sluice2.jpg
c. 1860 Part of Vale Royal locks on the Weaver Navigation. Originally a lock, it was converted into a sluice channel in about 1890. It has sandstone walls, and a wooden sluice gate suspended from a sandstone bridge with limestone dressings.[34] II
Small lock, sluice and swing bridge
53°13′44″N 2°32′26″W / 53.22883°N 2.54044°W / 53.22883; -2.54044 (Small lock, sluice and swing bridge)
Vale Royal Small Lock.jpg
c. 1860 Part of Vale Royal locks on the Weaver Navigation. The walls are in sandstone, the lock gates are wooden, and the swing bridge is in wood and iron.[35] II
Lodge
53°13′12″N 2°33′23″W / 53.2201°N 2.5565°W / 53.2201; -2.5565 (Lodge)
c. 1870 Situated at the entrance to Vale Royal Drive, this is a two-storey house in red sandstone with a tiled roof. It has a cross-shaped plan. The entrance front has a projecting central gable above an arched doorway. On the right side is another projecting gable, under which is a single-storey canted bay window. The other windows are casements.[29][36] II
Vicarage
53°13′23″N 2°33′32″W / 53.2230°N 2.5590°W / 53.2230; -2.5590 (Vicarage)
1878 Designed by John Douglas for Lord Delamere. It is in two storeys, the lower storey being in red brick, and the upper storey timber-framed and jettied at the front. The roof is tiled. Other features include tall brick chimneys, and a canted bay window. The other windows are either mullioned and transomed, or casements.[21][37] II
Boundary post
53°13′37″N 2°32′23″W / 53.22706°N 2.53973°W / 53.22706; -2.53973 (Boundary post)
c. 1890 The boundary post stands beside the Weaver Navigation. It is in cast iron and consists of a circular post with concave and domed top. The top contains a roundel encircling the letters R .W. N. (River Weaver Navigation).[38] II
Flood gates and sluice bridge
53°13′24″N 2°32′04″W / 53.22344°N 2.53431°W / 53.22344; -2.53431 (Flood gates and sluice bridge)
Vale Royal Sluice.jpg
c. 1890 The flood gates and sluice bridge are at a point where the River Weaver and Weaver Navigation separate. The walls are in sandstone and the bridge is in cast iron.[39] II
Lychgate,
St Mary's Church
53°13′12″N 2°33′24″W / 53.21988°N 2.55680°W / 53.21988; -2.55680 (Lychgate, St Mary's Church)
Whitegate lychgate.jpg
1921 This consists of a timber frame on an ashlar base with a tiled roof. Its gables have decorative bargeboards. There are two bressumers, each of which carries an inscription.[40] II

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 3 April 2015 
  2. ^ Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 646–649
  3. ^ Historic England, "Vale Royal Abbey, Whitegate and Marton (1160862)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 February 2013nons= 
  4. ^ Historic England, "Vale Royal Abbey, Whitegate and Marton (1016862)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 February 2013 
  5. ^ Historic England, "Long stone, Whitegate and Marton (1310464)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 February 2013 
  6. ^ Historic England, "The Longstone, a part of a cross shaft on Longstone Lane at the junction with Shay's Lane, Whitegate and Marton (1013475)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 February 2013 
  7. ^ Historic England, "Plague stone, Whitegate and Marton (1139205)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  8. ^ Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 666–667
  9. ^ Historic England, "Church of St Mary, Whitegate and Marton (1160911)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  10. ^ Historic England, "Beeches Cottage, Whitegate and Marton (1139207)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  11. ^ Historic England, "Vale View Cottages, Whitegate and Marton (1261160)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 February 2013 
  12. ^ Historic England, "Bradford Mill House, Whitegate and Marton (1139178)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 February 2013 
  13. ^ Historic England, "The Old Post Office, Whitegate and Marton (1139215)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 February 2013 
  14. ^ Historic England, "Foxes Green Farmhouse, Whitegate and Marton (1160763)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 February 2013 
  15. ^ Historic England, "Keepers Cottage, Whitegate and Marton (1329845)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 February 2013 
  16. ^ Historic England, "Rookery Cottage and Swan Cottage, Whitegate and Marton (1139203)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  17. ^ Historic England, "Briary Farmhouse, Whitegate and Marton (1160679)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  18. ^ Historic England, "Falcon Cottage and Cottage adjacent, Whitegate and Marton (1139208)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  19. ^ Historic England, "Beech Farmhouse, Whitegate and Marton (1139204)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  20. ^ Historic England, "Rookery Cottage, Whitegate and Marton (1310490)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 February 2013 
  21. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 667
  22. ^ Historic England, "Whitegate Cottage, Whitegate and Marton (1160903)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  23. ^ Historic England, "Whitegate House, Whitegate and Marton (1139186)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  24. ^ Historic England, "Gatepiers in churchyard of St Mary, Whitegate and Marton (1139187)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  25. ^ Historic England, "Monkey Lodge, Whitegate and Marton (1160929)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  26. ^ Historic England, "Sandiway Bank Farmhouse, Whitegate and Marton (1228575)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  27. ^ Historic England, "Abottsmoss Hall, Whitegate and Marton (1139206)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  28. ^ Historic England, "Bark House Farmhouse, Whitegate and Marton (1160787)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  29. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 649
  30. ^ Historic England, "Former stable block at Vale Royal Abbey, Whitegate and Marton (1139181)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 February 2013 
  31. ^ Historic England, "Marton House Farmhouse, Whitegate and Marton (1160641)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  32. ^ Historic England, "The Nun's Grave Cross, Whitegate and Marton (1160875)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  33. ^ Historic England, "Monument to Lady Delamere at Monk's Well Cottage, Whitegate and Marton (1139182)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 February 2013 
  34. ^ Historic England, "Sluice, channel and sluice a swing-bridges at Vale Royal Locks, Whitegate and Marton (1160896)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  35. ^ Historic England, "Small lock, lock gates and swing bridge, Vale Royal Locks, Whitegate and Marton (1139183)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 20 February 2013 
  36. ^ Historic England, "The Lodge, Whitegate and Marton (1139188)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  37. ^ Historic England, "The Vicarage, Whitegate and Marton (1139189)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  38. ^ Historic England, "Boundary post, Whitegate and Marton (1160887)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  39. ^ Historic England, "Flood gates and sluice bridge, Weaver Navigation, Whitegate and Marton (1139184)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 
  40. ^ Historic England, "Lych-gate in churchyard of St Mary, Whitegate and Marton (1160920)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 February 2013 

Sources