Livia S. Eberlin

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Livia Schiavinato Eberlin is a Brazilian analytical chemist who won a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship for her research on the use of mass spectrometry to detect cancerous tissue.[1][2]

Education and career[edit]

Eberlin is the daughter of Marcos Nogueira Eberlin, a Brazilian chemist at the University of Campinas.[3] She was born in Campinas, and was a student at the University of Campinas herself; she earned her bachelor's degree there in 2007. During her undergraduate program, she did summer research in chemistry at Purdue University,[4] where her father also had research ties.[3] She continued at Purdue for her doctorate, and completed it in 2012; her dissertation, Developments in ambient mass spectrometry imaging and its applications in biomedical research and cancer diagnosis, was supervised by R. Graham Cooks.[4][5]

After postdoctoral research at Stanford University with Richard Zare, she joined the chemistry faculty at the University of Texas at Austin in 2012.[4]

Contributions[edit]

In her research, she developed a pen-like device that she claims can detect cancerous tissue by touching it during surgery, improving on previous methods that involve removing the tissue, freezing and slicing it, and examining the slices under a microscope.[6] As well as her work on cancer diagnosis, Eberlin has also worked with Cooks and her father on the use of mass spectrometry to quickly detect counterfeit money.[3]

Recognition[edit]

Eberlin won the Marion Milligan Mason Award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2017; the award is given every two years to promising young female researchers in chemistry.[7] She won a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship in 2018 for her research on the use of mass spectrometry "to differentiate more quickly and accurately diseased from healthy tissues during surgery".[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Livia S. Eberlin, MacArthur Foundation, retrieved 2018-10-04
  2. ^ a b Wyllie, Julian (October 4, 2018), "Meet the Academics Who Nabbed This Year's MacArthur 'Genius' Grants", The Chronicle of Higher Education
  3. ^ a b c Bradley, David (2010), "Counterfeit Spectroscopy", ChemViews Magazine, ChemPubSoc Europe, doi:10.1002/chemv.201000020
  4. ^ a b c "About Livia", Livia S. Eberlin Research Group, University of Texas at Austin, retrieved 2018-10-04
  5. ^ Eberlin, Livia S. (2012), "Developments in ambient mass spectrometry imaging and its applications in biomedical research and cancer diagnosis", Purdue e-Pubs, Purdue University, retrieved 2018-10-04
  6. ^ Petrova, Magdalena (March 22, 2018), This 3-D printed pen lets surgeons detect cancer in 10 seconds, CNBC
  7. ^ AAAS Marion Milligan Mason Award Recipients, American Association for the Advancement of Science, retrieved 2018-10-04

External links[edit]