Louis A. Thebaud

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Louis A. Thebaud
BornOctober 4, 1859
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.
DiedApril 2, 1939
Morristown, New Jersey, U.S.
ResidenceIdlewild, Morris Plains, New Jersey, U.S.
Beauregard, Morristown, New Jersey, U.S.
OccupationBusinessman, sportsman, philanthropist
Spouse(s)Gertrude Lee McCurdy
Andrée des Etangs
RelativesRichard Aldrich McCurdy (father-in-law)

Louis A. Thebaud (October 24, 1859 – April 2, 1939) was an American businessman, sportsman and philanthropist in the Gilded Age. After working for C. H. Raymond & Co., a contractor of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, for a dozen years, he was caught in a corporate scandal and sued alongside other members of his family. In his retirement, he sponsored sailing races and supported the First World War effort as well as a hospital in New Jersey. Additionally, he introduced Britanny spaniels, a breed of hunting dogs, to the United States, and he was the founding president of the American Brittany Club.

Early life[edit]

Louis A. Thebaud was born on October 24, 1859 in Orange, New Jersey.[1] His parents were Paul Louis Thébaud and his first wife, born Mathilde Louisa Pillot. He was of French descent.[1] The Thébaud family, who were members of the French nobility, had emigrated to the United States in the wake of the French Revolution, where they ran an import-export business.[1] His great grand father was Joseph Thebaud and his grand father Edward Thebaud.

Business career[edit]

Thebaud worked for C. H. Raymond & Co. from 1893 to 1906.[2] The firm, headed by Charles H. Raymond, was a contractor for the Mutual Life Insurance Company, whose president was his father-in-law.[2] In 1906, Thebaud was sued by the company alongside his father-in-law, brother-in-law, and Raymond, over a corporate scandal.[2] As early as 1905, the press revealed he was paid between $920,113 and $932,831 in commissions by Mutual life.[3][4] The scandal was described by The Washington Post as a prime example of nepotism.[5]

Thebaud served on the Board of Directors of the Morristown Trust Company.[6]

Philanthropy[edit]

Thebaud and his wife made charitable contributions to the American Field Service in France during the First World War.[7] They also supported an all girls' school in Saint-Briac-sur-Mer, Brittany, France.[8] Additionally, they donated US$200,000 to the All Souls Hospital in Morristown, New Jersey,[9] US$100,000 of which were donated specifically by his wife.[8][10] They also donated an ambulance in 1930.[9]

Boating and hunting[edit]

Thebaud sponsored the Gertrude L. Thebaud, an American schooner named in honor of his wife, in 1930.[11][12] It won the Lipton Trophy in 1930.[8]

Thebaud first imported griffons, a breed of hunting dogs, to the United States.[1] Later, he introduced the Britanny spaniel, another breed of hunting dogs, to the United States.[1] Thebaud used Britanny spaniels on his quail hunts in Florida.[1] Meanwhile, two of his dogs, Franche de Cosqueron and Genette du Mesnil, were recorded in the Field Dog Stud Book.[1] Additionally, his dogs competed in field trials and dog shows.[1][13]

Thebaud and Louis de la Fleche co-founded the Brittany Spaniel Club of North America (later known as the American Brittany Club) in 1936.[1] Thebaud served as its first president.[1]

Personal life[edit]

In November 1886, Thebaud married Gertrude Lee McCurdy, the daughter of Richard Aldrich McCurdy, president of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York.[12] The couple resided at Idlewild, a mansion in Morris Plains, New Jersey.[14] By 1905, McCurdy acquired a 300-acre estate in Morristown, New Jersey from B.O. Canfield in 1905, tore it down, and commissioned the construction of a new mansion called Beauregard.[10]

Gertrude died on November 24, 1930, and Thébaud married Andrée des Etangs on April 26, 1933.[8] There were no children of either marriage.[8]

Thebaud was a co-founder of the Whippany River Club, a millionaire's club in Morristown, alongside Robert McCurdy, R.H. Williams, Rudolph Kissel, Gordon McDonald, Benjamin Nicoll, Robert D. Foote, Norman Henderson, Arthur R. Whitney, Frederick O. Spedden, W. DeLancy Kountze, Francis H. Kinnicutt.[10][15]

Death[edit]

Thebaud died on April 2, 1939 in hospital in Morristown, New Jersey.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Louis Andre Thebaud" (PDF). American Kennel Club. Retrieved December 5, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c "Two More Mutual Suits. Complains Against McCurdys and Raymond Company Served". The New York Tribune. New York City. March 27, 1906. p. 2. Retrieved December 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ "Paid By the Mutual. Big Commissions to Members of McCurdy's Family. More than $2,400,000. Extraordinary Grand Jury to Investigate Insurance Scandals". The Wilmington Messenger. Wilmington, North Carolina. October 6, 1905. p. 1. Retrieved December 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ "The M'Curdy Share. Profits Through Family Relations With Mutual in Last 21 Years Amount to $4,534,120. President's Big Salary". The Scranton Republican. Scranton, Pennsylvania. October 7, 1905. p. 1. Retrieved December 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ "It's a Family Affair". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C. October 7, 1905. p. 48. Retrieved December 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ "Morristown Trust Co". Bernardsville News. Bernardsville, New Jersey. April 1, 1915. p. 4. Retrieved December 5, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  7. ^ "Appendix J: NAMES AND DONORS OF CARS IN THE AMERICAN FIELD SERVICE IN FRANCE". History of the American Field Service in France. Brigham Young University. Retrieved December 5, 2015.
  8. ^ a b c d e "L.A. THEBAUD DIES; PHILANTHROPIST, 79; Was a Sponsor of Schooner Gertrude L. Thebaud, Winner of Lipton Trophy in 1930 AIDED FRANCE IN THE WAR He and His First Wife Also Gave Maternity Building to Hospital in Morristown" (PDF). The New York City. April 3, 1939. Retrieved December 5, 2015. Louis A. Thebaud of Canfield Road, Convent, philanthropist and sportsman, died today at All Souls Hospital after a long illness at the age of 79.
  9. ^ a b "Give Ambulance to All Souls'". Bernardsville News. Bernardsville, New Jersey. March 27, 1930. p. 1. Retrieved December 5, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  10. ^ a b c Rae, John W. (1999). Mansions of Morris County. Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. p. 22. ISBN 073850064X. OCLC 42724737. Retrieved December 4, 2015.
  11. ^ McLaren, Keith (2009). A Race for Real Sailors: Bluenose and the International Fisherman's Cup 1920 - 1938. Vancouver, Canada: Douglas & McIntyre. pp. 163–164. ISBN 1567923135. Retrieved December 4, 2015.
  12. ^ a b "Thebaud Sponsor Taken By Death". The Evening Independent. Massilon, Ohio. April 3, 1939. p. 9. Retrieved December 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  13. ^ Dole, Frank P. (February 8, 1920). "Fifty-four Different Breeds, 1,612 Actual Dogs, Representing 2,780 Entires, to Be Benched at Westminster Show. Dog Show Entry Is the Best In Many Seasons. Pacific Coast, Canada and Middle West Exhibitors Will Be Prominent in Westminster Kennel Club's Exhibition in Grand Central Palace". The Sun and The New York Herald. New York City. p. 25. Retrieved December 5, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read
  14. ^ Vogt, Virginia Dyer; Myers, Daniel B. (2000). Morris Plains. Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. p. 87. ISBN 9780738504827. Retrieved December 4, 2015.
  15. ^ Rae, John W. (2002). Morristown: A Military Headquarters of the American Revolution. Mount Pleasant, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. pp. 106–108. ISBN 073852400X. Retrieved December 4, 2015.
  16. ^ "Louis A. Thebaud". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Brooklyn, New York. April 3, 1939. p. 9. Retrieved December 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access publication – free to read