Love and War (Australian TV series)

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Love and War
Directed byPatrick Barton
Oscar Whitbread
Country of originAustralia
Original language(s)English
No. of episodes6
Production
Producer(s)John Croyston
Running time90 mins
Release
Original networkABC
Original release6 September 1967

Love and War is a 1967 Australian TV series.[1] It consists of six plays shot in ABC's Gore Hill studios. All of the self-contained episodes were produced by John Croyston, but not all of them were written by Australian script-writers.

Man of Destiny by George Bernard Shaw - 6 September 1967[edit]

Produced by Patrick Barton with Brian Hannan (Napoleon Bonaparte), Anne Charleston (the Lady), Dennis Miller (the Lieutenant), Stanley Page (the Innkeeper)[2]

Sergeant Musgrave's Dance by John Arden - 13 September 1967[edit]

L'Flaherty, VC by George Bernard Shaw - 20 September 1967[edit]

The Brass Butterfly by William Golding - 27 September 1967[edit]

Intersection by Michael Boddy - 4 October 1967[edit]

Cast: Helen Morse, John Gregg.[3]

A woman leaves a small town where she has a boyfriend and falls for a guitarist. The Sydney Morning Herald said "The cast did what they could with it. Director John Croyston did what he could."[4]

Construction by John Croyston - 11 October 1967[edit]

Director: Storry Walton. Cast: Ron Graham, Moya O'Sullivan.[5]

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare - 20 October 1967[edit]

Directed by Oscar Whitbread with Sean Scully (Romeo) and Liza Goddard (Juliet)[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Plays with themes of love and war". The Canberra Times. 42, (11, 784). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 4 September 1967. p. 15. Retrieved 19 February 2017 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ "WEDNESDAY I". The Canberra Times. 42, (11, 784). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 4 September 1967. p. 17. Retrieved 19 February 2017 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "TELEVISION A night of free TV". The Canberra Times. 42, (11, 815). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 10 October 1967. p. 15. Retrieved 23 February 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ "ON TELEVISION It's tough for TV writers". Sydney Morning Herald. October 5, 1967. p. 11.
  5. ^ "LEISURE THE ARTS". The Canberra Times. 42, (11, 816). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 11 October 1967. p. 24. Retrieved 19 February 2017 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "TELEVISION A WEEK OF SAD STORIES". The Canberra Times. 42, (11, 824). Australian Capital Territory, Australia. 20 October 1967. p. 15. Retrieved 19 February 2017 – via National Library of Australia.

External links[edit]