M band

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This article is about the radar band. For other uses, see M band (disambiguation).
NATO M band
Frequency range
60 - 100 GHz
Wavelength range
5 – 3 mm
Related bands
  • V / W (IEEE)
  • EHF (ITU)

M band can refer to two different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, in the radio and near-infrared.

Radio[edit]

The NATO M band is the obsolete designation given to the radio frequencies from 60 to 100 GHz (equivalent to wavelengths between 5 and 3 mm) during the cold war period. Since 1992 frequency allocations, allotment and assignments are in line to NATO Joint Civil/Military Frequency Agreement (NJFA).[1]

However, in order to identify military radio spectrum requirements, e.g. for crises management planning, training, Electronic warfare activities, or in military operations, this system is still in use.

The NATO M band is also a subset of the EHF band as defined by the ITU.[2] It intersects with the V (50–75 GHz) and W band (75–110 GHz) of the older IEEE classification system.[3]

NATO Radio spectrum designation
LATEST SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE SYSTEM
BAND FREQUENCY (MHz) BAND FREQUENCY (MHz)
A 0 – 250 I 100 – 150
B 250 – 500 G 150 – 225
C 500 – 1 000 P 225 – 390
D 1 000 – 2 000 L 390 – 1 550
E 2 000 – 3 000 S 1 550 – 3 900
F 3 000 – 4 000 C 3 900 – 6 200
G 4 000 – 6 000 X 6 200 – 10 900
H 6 000 – 8 000 K 10 900 – 36 000
I 8 000 – 10 000 Ku 10 900 – 20 000
J 10 000 – 20 000 Ka 20 000 – 36 000
K 20 000 – 40 000 Q 36 000 – 46 000
L 40 000 – 60 000 V 46 000 – 56 000
M 60 000 – 100 000 W 56 000 – 100 000

Infrared astronomy[edit]

Atmospheric windows in the infrared. The M band is the transmission window centred on 4.7 micrometres

In infrared astronomy, the M band refers to an atmospheric transmission window centred on 4.7 micrometres (in the mid-infrared).

References[edit]