Ka band

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
IEEE Ka band
Frequency range
26.5 – 40 GHz
Wavelength range
1.11 cm – 7.5 mm
Related bands
  • K (NATO)
  • SHF (ITU)

The Ka band ("kay-ay band") covers the frequencies of 26.5–40 GHz,[1] i.e. wavelengths from slightly over one centimeter down to 7.5 millimeters.[2] The Ka band is part of the K band of the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum. This symbol refers to "K-above": in other words, the band directly above the K-band. The 30/20 GHz band is used in communications satellites, uplink in either the 27.5 GHz and 31 GHz bands,[3] and high-resolution, close-range targeting radars aboard military airplanes. Some frequencies in this radio band are used for vehicle speed detection by law enforcement.[4] Kepler Mission uses this frequency range to downlink the scientific data collected by the space telescope.

The designation "Ka-band" is from Kurz-above, which stems from the German word "kurz" meaning short.[5]

In satellite communications, the Ka band allows higher bandwidth communication. It is used in the Inmarsat I-5 system[6] and will be used in the Iridium Next satellite series, as well as the James Webb Space Telescope. The Ka band is more susceptible to rain attenuation than is the Ku band, which in turn is more susceptible than the C band.[7]


  1. ^ R. Ludwig, P. Bretchko, RF Circuit Design, Theory and Applications, Prentice Hall NJ, 2000.
  2. ^ "Basics of Space Flight Section I. The Environment of Space". 
  3. ^ "Ka Band". 
  4. ^ Elert, Glenn. "Frequency of a Police Radar Gun". 
  5. ^ http://www.itwissen.info/definition/lexikon/K-Band-K-band.html (german)
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 11, 2013. Retrieved August 6, 2013. 
  7. ^ Miller, Peter. "Ka-Band – the future of satellite communication?" (pdf). Retrieved 2016-07-06.