Manatí Bridge at Mata de Plátano

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Manatí Bridge at Mata de Plátano
Locator map
Locator map
Manatí Bridge at Mata de Plátano
Location of the bridge in Puerto Rico
Location Highway 6685, km 9.7
Ciales municipality, Puerto Rico
Coordinates 18°21′32″N 66°28′45″W / 18.359008°N 66.479162°W / 18.359008; -66.479162Coordinates: 18°21′32″N 66°28′45″W / 18.359008°N 66.479162°W / 18.359008; -66.479162
Built 1905
Architect Ninlliat, Luis
Architectural style double intersection Pratt
MPS Historic Bridges of Puerto Rico MPS
NRHP Reference # 95000847[1]
Added to NRHP July 19, 1995

Manatí Bridge at Mata de Plátano, also known as Puente Juan José Jiménez and listed as Bridge #321 in Puerto Rico's bridge inventory, was built in 1905 near Ciales, Puerto Rico. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995.[1]

It was the first truss bridge built in Puerto Rico under the American administration (1898–1900) after the Spanish–American War.

The bridge has an 80 metres (260 ft) span crossing the Manati River. For Puerto Rico, the span is high, 44 feet (13 m) above the river, "above a spectacular curving canyon of vertical walls traversed by the Manati River". It is a rare type: a steel double intersection Pratt truss, above a concrete substructure, and is the only such highway bridge in Puerto Rico. Its roadway is 3.8 metres (12 ft) wide.[2]:

At least 10 railway bridges used the double intersection Pratt truss design, in the French-owned railway that was built during 1890-93 between San Juan and Ponce. Only one of those, across the Arecibo River, survived in 1994.[3]:16

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ "Manatí Bridge at Mata de Plátano" (PDF). National Park Service. July 31, 1994. Retrieved 2016-05-18.  with 2 photos from 1989-93
  3. ^ Luis F. Pumarada O'Neill (July 31, 1994). "Historic Bridges of Puerto Rico, c. 1840 - 1950" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2016-05-13. 

External links[edit]