Margaret Wingfield

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Margaret Wingfield

Personal details
Born(1912-01-09)9 January 1912
Surrey, United Kingdom
Died(2002-04-06)6 April 2002
Kingston on Thames
NationalityBritish
OccupationPresident, Liberal Party (UK)
President, National Council for Women

Margaret Elizabeth Wingfield CBE (19 January 1912 – 6 April 2002) was a British Liberal Party politician and President of the Liberal Party from 1975-1976.[1]

Background[edit]

Wingfield was educated at Freiburg University and the London School of Economics. She was a social worker and housewife.[2] She was the niece of the Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) Charles McCurdy. Her granddaughter is Carita Ogden, who is a Liberal Democrat Councillor in the London Borough of Lambeth.

Political career[edit]

Wingfield was active internally with the Liberal Party. She served on the Liberal Party Council from 1962. She was an executive member, of the British Group of Liberal International.[3] She was Chairman of the Liberal Party social security panel.[4] She was President of the Liberal Party from 1975-76. Her term of office coincided with the time of the revelations about party leader, Jeremy Thorpe's private life and his subsequent resignation.

Wingfield also stood as a Liberal candidate for public office. She stood as a candidate for the London County Council. She also stood four times for parliament; for Wokingham in 1964 and 1966, at the Walthamstow West by-election, 1967 and for Chippenham in 1970.

External links[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by
Arthur Holt
President of the Liberal Party
1975–1976
Succeeded by
Basil Goldstone
Non-profit organization positions
Preceded by
Diane Reid
President of the National Council of Women of Great Britain
1980–1984
Succeeded by
Mary Mayne
  1. ^ Meadowcroft, Michael (17 April 2002). "Margaret Wingfield". The Guardian. The Guardian. Retrieved 24 August 2016.
  2. ^ The Times House of Commons, 1964
  3. ^ The Times House of Commons, 1966
  4. ^ The Times House of Commons, 1970