Maria de Belém Roseira

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This name uses Portuguese naming customs. The first or maternal family name is Roseira and the second or paternal family name is Martins Coelho.
Maria de Belém Roseira
GCC
Maria de Belém Roseira.jpg
President of the Socialist Party
In office
9 September 2011 – 29 November 2014
Leader António José Seguro
Preceded by António de Almeida Santos
Succeeded by Carlos César
Personal details
Born (1949-07-28) 28 July 1949 (age 67)
Porto, Portugal
Political party Socialist Party
Spouse(s) Manuel Pina
Alma mater University of Coimbra

Maria de Belém Roseira Martins Coelho Henriques de Pina,[1] GCC (b. Porto, 28 July 1949) is a Portuguese politician who served as President of Socialist Party from 2011 to 2014. She is informally known by Maria de Belém, or, more commonly, Maria de Belém Roseira.

She graduated in Law at the University of Coimbra in 1972.[2]

She was Minister of Health (1995–1999) in the first government of António Guterres, and Minister for Equality (1999–2000) early in his second government.

In December 2006, while she was still President of the Parliamentary Health Commission, she was hired as a consultant by Espírito Santo Saúde, a private health provider. She stated that she did not consider there would be any conflict of interest holding both roles simultaneously [3] In 2015, while she was still a member of parliament, she was put forward as a member of the Executive Council of the Board of Governors of Luz Saúde, (formerly Espírito Santo Saúde).[4]

More recently, she was a candidate on the Portuguese presidential election, 2016, but received only 4.26% of the votes, losing to Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa, and not being supported as the official candidate of her party.[citation needed]

References[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by
António de Almeida Santos
President of the Socialist Party
2011–2014
Succeeded by
Carlos César
Preceded by
António José Seguro
Secretary-General of the Socialist Party
Acting

2014
Succeeded by
António Costa