Mark Madsen

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Mark Madsen
012308-TC-Twolves004-MarkMadsen.jpg
Los Angeles Lakers
PositionAssistant coach
LeagueNBA
Personal information
Born (1976-01-28) January 28, 1976 (age 42)
Walnut Creek, California, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 9 in (2.06 m)
Listed weight245 lb (111 kg)
Career information
High schoolSan Ramon Valley
(Danville, California)
CollegeStanford (1996–2000)
NBA draft2000 / Round: 1 / Pick: 29th overall
Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
Playing career2000–2009
PositionPower forward / Center
Number35
Career history
As player:
20002003Los Angeles Lakers
20032009Minnesota Timberwolves
As coach:
2009–2010Utah Flash (assistant)
2012–2013Stanford (assistant)
2013Los Angeles D-Fenders
2013–presentLos Angeles Lakers (assistant)
Career highlights and awards

Mark Ellsworth Madsen (born January 28, 1976) is an American former professional basketball player and current assistant coach of the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Due to his hustle and physical style of play, he received the nickname "Mad Dog" while playing for the San Ramon Valley High School Wolves - the moniker continued during his time with the Stanford Cardinal and beyond.

College[edit]

Madsen played NCAA basketball at Stanford, where he finished his career ranked in the school's career top 10 in blocks and rebounds. In addition, Madsen helped the Cardinal to four NCAA tournament appearances, including a Final Four berth in 1998. Perhaps his signature moment at Stanford was his dunk and free throw that gave Stanford a lead over Rhode Island, propelling the team into the Final Four, where it lost to eventual champion Kentucky. Madsen was a two-time All-American and a two-time All-Pac-10 selection.

NBA[edit]

The Los Angeles Lakers selected Madsen in the first round (29th pick overall) of the 2000 NBA draft. He contributed to the Lakers' NBA championships in 2001 and 2002, and became well known for his goofy dances at the victory parades for those championships.

Talking about his prime with the Lakers, Shaquille O'Neal said that the only player who could thwart him from his dominant play was Madsen. "He used to beat me up in practice", O'Neal said.[1]

Madsen signed with the Timberwolves as a free agent before the start of the 2003–04 NBA season. He played six seasons for the Wolves.

On July 20, 2009, Madsen was traded to the Los Angeles Clippers along with Craig Smith and Sebastian Telfair in exchange for Quentin Richardson.[2] On August 21, 2009, he was waived by the Clippers.[3]

His career averages were 2.2 points, 2.6 rebounds, and 0.4 assists and 11.8 minutes played per game.

Coaching[edit]

Following being waived, Madsen was hired as the assistant coach for the Utah Flash of the NBA Development League (D-League).[4] In 2012, he was hired as an assistant coach at Stanford.[5] On May 13, 2013, he was named head coach of the Los Angeles D-Fenders, a D-League team owned by the Los Angeles Lakers.[6] On July 19, 2013, Madsen was promoted to a player development coach position with the Lakers.[7] On September 16, 2014 Madsen was promoted to full fledged assistant coach by Byron Scott.[8] After Byron Scott was dismissed as head coach of the Lakers, new head coach Luke Walton retained Madsen as assistant coach on July 1, 2016.[9]

Personal[edit]

Madsen is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Madsen speaks Spanish, acquiring the language from a two-year mission abroad in Málaga, Spain on behalf of his church following his graduation from high school.

As a youth, Madsen attained the rank of Eagle Scout and credits Scouting with teaching him about leadership, character and mentoring.[10]

In fall 2010, Madsen enrolled in the Stanford Graduate School of Business. In June 2012, he received an M.B.A. degree with a Certificate in Public Management.[11]

Madsen married Hannah Harkness on September 3, 2016.

NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2000–01 L.A. Lakers 70 3 9.2 .487 1.000 .703 2.2 .3 .1 .1 2.0
2001–02 L.A. Lakers 59 5 11.0 .452 .000 .648 2.7 .7 .3 .2 2.8
2002–03 L.A. Lakers 54 22 14.5 .423 .000 .590 2.9 .7 .3 .4 3.2
2003–04 Minnesota 72 12 17.3 .495 .000 .483 3.8 .4 .5 .3 3.6
2004–05 Minnesota 41 14 14.7 .515 .000 .500 3.1 .4 .2 .3 2.1
2005–06 Minnesota 62 7 10.9 .409 .000 .426 2.3 .2 .4 .3 1.2
2006–07 Minnesota 56 0 8.4 .535 .000 .517 1.6 .2 .2 .2 1.1
2007–08 Minnesota 20 6 7.6 .158 .000 .250 1.9 .2 .2 .1 .5
2008–09 Minnesota 19 1 6.1 .214 .000 .000 .9 .2 .1 .1 .3
Career 453 70 11.8 .457 .063 .527 2.6 .4 .3 .2 2.2

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2001 L.A. Lakers 13 0 3.7 .077 .000 .600 .8 .3 .0 .2 .4
2002 L.A. Lakers 7 0 1.4 .000 .000 .000 .3 .0 .0 .0 .0
2003 L.A. Lakers 12 2 14.1 .419 .000 .438 2.3 1.0 .3 .2 2.8
2004 Minnesota 17 0 13.1 .531 .000 .448 3.4 .1 .3 .2 2.8
Career 49 2 9.2 .403 .000 .460 2.0 .4 .2 .2 1.7

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://lakersblog.latimes.com/lakersblog/2011/11/shaq-shaquille-oneal-kobe-bryant-.html
  2. ^ "Clippers Acquire Telfair, Smith and Madsen from Minnesota for Richardson". NBA.com. 2009-07-20. Retrieved 2009-07-21.
  3. ^ "Clippers Waive Mark Madsen". NBA.com. 2009-08-21. Retrieved 2009-08-22.
  4. ^ Back in a Flash: Ex-Laker Mark Madsen begins coaching career as a Utah assistant Archived 2015-07-11 at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ Stanford hires Mark Madsen as assistant coach
  6. ^ Los Angeles D-Fenders Name Mark Madsen as Head Coach Archived 2013-06-01 at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ "Lakers hire Mark Madsen as player development coach". InsideHoops.com. July 19, 2013. Retrieved July 19, 2013.
  8. ^ Pincus, Eric. "Lakers announce Byron Scott's coaching staff - Los Angeles Times". latimes.com. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  9. ^ "Lakers Announce Assistant Coach Hires | Los Angeles Lakers". Los Angeles Lakers. Retrieved 2018-10-07.
  10. ^ Townley, Alvin. Legacy of Honor: The Values and Influence of America's Eagle Scouts. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 205–206. ISBN 0-312-36653-1. Retrieved 2006-12-29.
  11. ^ "Certificate and Award Recipients". Stanford Graduate School of Business. Retrieved July 1, 2012.

External links[edit]