Mary Nolan (politician)

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Mary Nolan
Mary Nolan.jpg
Member of the Oregon House of Representatives
from the 36th District
In office
2001–2013
Preceded by Anitra Rasmussen
Succeeded by Jennifer Williamson
Majority Leader of the Oregon House of Representatives
In office
2009–2011
Preceded by Dave Hunt
Succeeded by Tina Kotek (as Democratic Leader)
Val Hoyle (as Majority Leader)
Personal details
Born 1954 (age 62–63)
Chicago, Illinois [1][2]
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Mark Gardiner
Residence Portland, Oregon
Alma mater Dartmouth College
Occupation Business executive
Signature

Mary Nolan (born 1954) is a Democratic politician from the U.S. state of Oregon. She represented District 36 (formerly District 11) in the Oregon House of Representatives from 2001 to 2013, and served as the majority leader from 2008-2010. She ran unsuccessfully for the Portland City Council in 2012.

Personal life and education[edit]

Mary Nolan was born in Chicago, Illinois.[1][2] She is married to Mark Gardiner; they have one daughter.[3]

Nolan was in the first class of women admitted into Dartmouth College,[4] from which she graduated magna cum laude in mathematics.[4]

Following her departure from elected politics, Nolan was a finalist for a position with Planned Parenthood, and was then hired in 2013 as a vice president at FamilyCare, a Medicare and Medicaid managed-care provider in Portland.[5]

Political career[edit]

Nolan was first elected to the Oregon House of Representatives in 2000. Upon winning her second term in 2002, she was named the assistant Democratic leadership.[6] Before the 2009 legislative session, Dave Hunt, the then-majority leader, was elected speaker of the Oregon House of Representatives.[7] The Democratic Caucus then elected Nolan as the new majority leader.[7] She was the House Majority Leader in the Oregon House of Representatives from November 2008 until November 2010. In November 2010, the House Democratic Caucus did not re-elect Nolan to any leadership position.

According to The Oregonian, as of 2010 Nolan voted with Democrats 96.77% of the time, and had a 1.08% absence record.[8] After Nolan voted "no" on House Bill 2001, which would have increased transportation taxes by $300 million a year in 2009, The Oregonian reported that the move could mean that she may be planning to run for another public office like Mayor of Portland or City Council because of what it meant for environmentalists who had opposed the transportation bill.[9]

Nolan ran for a seat on the Portland City Council in the May 2012, challenging incumbent commissioner Amanda Fritz.[10] Fritz won the runoff election in November 2012.[11]

Committee assignments[edit]

2009 Regular Session

  • Conference Committee On HB 2227, Chair
  • Land Use Committee, Chair
  • Legislative Administration Committee
  • Rules Committee
  • Session Schedule Committee

Issues[edit]

Firearms[edit]

On March 14, 2003, Nolan introduced a bill that would make it a crime to possess a gun while on a public bus.[12]

Electoral history[edit]

Oregon House of Representatives, 11th district, 2000[13]

  • Mary Nolan (D) - 18,008
  • Joan Gardner (R) - 7,752

Oregon House of Representatives, 36th district, 2002[14]

  • Mary Nolan (D) - 16,092

Oregon House of Representatives, 36th district, 2004[15]

  • Mary Nolan (D) - 25,876
  • Joe H. Tabor (L) - 3,684

Oregon House of Representatives, 36th district, 2006[16]

  • Mary Nolan (D) - 20,344
  • Frank Dane (L) - 3,520

Oregon House of Representatives, 36th district, 2008

Other activities[edit]

Nolan is the chair of the NASA industry advisory council.[18] In the 2010 election for governor of Oregon, Nolan endorsed John Kitzhaber, the Democratic former Governor of Oregon.[19] The Kitzhaber campaign released this statement:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jarvisd (Jan 12, 2009). "She Flies With Her Own Wings: Oregon's Legislative Leaders". Daily Kos. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "Official Profile: Oregon (OR) State Representative Mary Nolan OR House of Representatives". freedomspeaks.com. 2010. Retrieved March 2, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Mary Nolan". Democratic Party of Oregon. Retrieved February 17, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "Representative Mary Nolan Biography". Oregon House of Representatives. leg.state.or.us. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  5. ^ Jaquiss, Nigel (April 1, 2013). "Former Rep. Mary Nolan Lands At FamilyCare". Willamette Week. 
  6. ^ "House Democrats pick leaders". Eugene Register-Guard. November 11, 2002. 
  7. ^ a b "Hunt Will Be House Democrats' Nominee For Speaker" (PDF). Oregon House of Representatives. leg.state.or.us. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  8. ^ "House Majority Leader:Mary Nolan". The Oregonian. gov.oregonlive.com. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  9. ^ Jeff Mapes (May 28, 2009). "Nolan's "no vote" causes Salem stir". The Oregonian. oregonlive.com. Retrieved February 25, 2010. 
  10. ^ Carla Axtman. "Portland City Council: Mary Nolan is in, facing off against Amanda Fritz". BlueOregon. blueoregon.com. Retrieved July 5, 2011. 
  11. ^ Brad Schmidt, "Portland City Council: Amanda Fritz defeats Mary Nolan, election results show", The Oregonian (November 6, 2012).
  12. ^ "Legislative Update: Bill to outlaw guns on buses". Associated Press. theworldlink.com. March 14, 2003. Retrieved February 25, 2010. 
  13. ^ "State Representative, 11th District, 2000". Oregon Secretary of State. sos.state.or.us. Retrieved February 25, 2010. 
  14. ^ "State Representative, 39th District, 2002" (PDF). Oregon Secretary of State. sos.state.or.us. Retrieved February 25, 2010. 
  15. ^ "State Representative, 39th District, 2004" (PDF). Oregon Secretary of State. sos.state.or.us. Retrieved February 25, 2010. 
  16. ^ "State Representative, 39th District, 2006" (PDF). Oregon Secretary of State. sos.state.or.us. Retrieved February 25, 2010. 
  17. ^ "House District 36: Mary Nolan". Willamette Week. wweek.com. October 15, 2008. Retrieved February 25, 2010. 
  18. ^ "State Representative Mary Nolan". sos.state.or.us. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  19. ^ a b "House Majority Leader Mary Nolan Throws Support Behind Kitzhaber". John Kitzhaber for Governor 2010. johnkitzhaber.com. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Anitra Rasmussen
Member of the Oregon House of Representatives from the 11th district
2001–2003
Succeeded by
Redistricted
Preceded by
Redistricted
Member of the Oregon House of Representatives from the 36th district
2003–2013
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Dave Hunt
Oregon House Majority Leader
2009–2011
Succeeded by
Dave Hunt