Mary Osborn

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Not to be confused with Emily Mary Osborn.
Mary Osborn
KlausandMary.jpg
Mary Osborn and her husband, Klaus Weber
Born 1940 (age 75–76)[1]
Darlington
Institutions
Alma mater
Thesis The Determination and Use of Mutagen Specificity in Bacteria Containing Nonsense Codons (1967)
Doctoral advisor Stanley Person[1][2][3]
Spouse Klaus Weber
Website
www.mpibpc.mpg.de/osborn

Mary Osborn (born 1940)[1] is an award-winning English cell biologist at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen, Germany.[4]

Life[edit]

Osborn was born in Darlington, UK,[citation needed], Osborn was educated at Cheltenham Ladies' College and Newnham College, Cambridge where she graduated in Mathematics and Physics in 1962.[5] She went on to take a masters in biophysics at Pennsylvania State University in 1963 and a PhD on mutagenesis in nonsense mutations in bacteria, awarded by Pennsylvania State University in 1972 and supervised by Stanley Person.[1][6]

Career[edit]

Osborn did postdoctoral research at Harvard University with Nobel Laureate James Watson. She conducted research at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK before moving to the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Osborn and her husband, Klaus Weber, relocated to the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in 1975.[7]

Research[edit]

Osborn's research has looked at a cell's cytoskeleton and in particular the microtubules of a Eukaryote cell.

Awards and honours[edit]

Osborn has been awarded several prizes and honours including:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Osborn, Mary (1967). The Determination and Use of Mutagen Specificity in Bacteria Containing Nonsense Codons (PhD thesis). Pennsylvania State University. 
  2. ^ Bockrath, R. C.; Osborn, M; Person, S (1968). "Nonsense suppression in a multiauxotrophic derivative of Escherichia coli 15T-: Identification and consequences of an amber triplet in the deoxyribomutase gene". Journal of Bacteriology. 96 (1): 146–53. PMC 252265free to read. PMID 4874302. 
  3. ^ Person, S; Osborn, M (1968). "The conversion of amber suppressors to ochre suppressors". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 60 (3): 1030–7. doi:10.1073/pnas.60.3.1030. PMC 225156free to read. PMID 4875805. 
  4. ^ Dean, Caroline; Osborn, Mary; Oshlack, Alicia; Thornton, Janet (2012). "Women in Science". Genome Biology. 13 (3): 148–201. doi:10.1186/gb4005. PMC 3439960free to read. PMID 22405408. 
  5. ^ "Mary Osborn CV". Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry. 2014. Archived from the original on 2014-03-05. 
  6. ^ "MARY OSBORN (England)". UNESCO. 2014. Archived from the original on 2014-08-19. 
  7. ^ Watt, F. M. (2004). "Mary Osborn". Journal of Cell Science. 117 (8): 1285–1286. doi:10.1242/jcs.01099.