Matanuska–Susitna College

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Matanuska–Susitna College
Type Public community and technical college
Established 1958 (1958)
Parent institution
University of Alaska Anchorage
Director Talis Colberg
Location Palmer, Alaska, United States
61°34′46″N 149°14′26″W / 61.57944°N 149.24056°W / 61.57944; -149.24056Coordinates: 61°34′46″N 149°14′26″W / 61.57944°N 149.24056°W / 61.57944; -149.24056
Website matsu.alaska.edu

Matanuska–Susitna College in Palmer, Alaska, north of Anchorage, is part of the University of Alaska Anchorage system. The college began in 1958 as Palmer Community College, changing its name in 1963 to correspond to the Matanuska-Susitna Borough where it is located. It is commonly called Mat-Su College. Total enrollment is about 1,650.

Talis Colberg was appointed as the fourth Director of the College in 2002. [1]

Academics[edit]

Associate degree programs[edit]

Matanuska–Susitna College offers two-year associate degree programs. Students can take courses that lead to an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Applied Science degree in the following areas:

Vocational programs[edit]

Many students at Matanuska–Susitna College attend its vocational education classes. It offers professional certification in:

In addition, Matanuska–Susitna College offers numerous community enrichment programs, such as watercolor painting, metalsmithing, knifemaking, and pottery. The Mat-Su Community Choir also has classes and recitals in the College.

Buildings[edit]

The Matanuska–Susitna College campus sits on a 950-acre (3.8 km2) area. The college has four main buildings, comprising a 102,676-square-foot (9,539 m2) facility:

  • Fred and Sara Machetanz Building is called the FSM. It contains most Social Sciences classes, Computer Information Office Systems classes, and the Student Services offices. It is named after Fred and Sara Machetanz, who donated large amounts of land to Mat-Su College; both received meritorious service awards from Mat-Su College in 1987. Fred Machetanz, who also received an honorary degree from Mat-Su in 1973, was a well-known and highly respected Alaskan artist. Numerous paintings of his can be viewed throughout the FSM. A portrait of Fred Machetanz hangs near the Student Services office.
  • Jalmar Kerttula Building is called the JKB. It is where most English, Computer Network Support, & Biology classes are held. It also houses the Academic Affairs office, Director's Office, Marketing, Student Government office, and Bookstore. A local state representative, Jalmar "Jay" Kerttula served in the Alaska Legislature for more than 30 years.
  • The Alvin S. Okeson Library or OLB; is the academic library. The library building also houses the Testing and Learning Center. It is named after a founder of the college. The library's collections include more than 45,000 items, including books, maps, videos, and CDs, and 80 periodicals in print format, with access to several thousand more.
  • Snodgrass Agricultural Science Building is referred to as Snodgrass Hall or Snod for short. Most mathematics and science classes are held there. It also houses the Paramedic Program, and will be housing the University of Alaska Anchorage School of Nursing after the expansion is complete. It is named after State Department of Agriculture Director Roland Snodgrass, who is often called the "Father of Alaskan Agriculture".
  • Glenn Massay Theater is referred to as the Massay ('mass-ee') theater or simply the theater. The Massay Theater is a 520-seat performing arts theater and the newest addition to the Mat-Su College, having opened February 2015. It is named after past director Glenn Massay, who in addition to serving as campus director for years was a supporter of and amateur performer in local theater. The Glenn Massay Theater was constructed for the purpose of hosting large scale theater productions, musical performances, film festivals, and lectures.

Notable alumni[edit]

Republican U.S. Vice Presidential nominee Sarah Palin took one class at the college in Fall 1985.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]