Melody of Love

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"Melody of Love" by Billy Vaughn
"Melody of Love" by Billy Vaughn

"Melody of Love" is a popular song. The music was originally written by Hans Engelmann in 1903. The lyrics were added by Tom Glazer in 1954.

Although recorded by Edison Records within a year of its release, the song's breakthrough came in 1955 with an instrumental version recorded by Billy Vaughn. Other charting versions in 1955 were by David Carroll, by The Four Aces, and by Leo Diamond.

The recording by Billy Vaughn was released by Dot Records as catalog number 15247. It first reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on December 1, 1954 and lasted 27 weeks on the chart, peaking at #2.[1]

The recording by David Carroll was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70516. It first reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on December 29, 1954 and lasted 17 weeks on the chart, peaking at #9.[1] This was Carroll's only hit on the Billboard best seller chart. Another Carroll version, featuring a narration by Paul Tremaine, was released on Mercury 70521. This version was shown as a best-selling version in Cashbox for most of "Melody Of Love"'s extensive chart run.

The recording by The Four Aces was released by Decca Records as catalog number 29395. It first reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on January 12, 1955 and lasted 17 weeks on the chart, peaking at #11.[1]

The recording by Leo Diamond was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-5973. It reached the Billboard Best Seller chart on February 9, 1955, its only week on the chart, at #30.[1]

Another version, by Frank Sinatra and Ray Anthony, also charted according to some sources.

With so many versions, the Cash Box chart (which always combined all versions of a song) naturally had a much higher standing for the song than Billboard, and the song was a #1 hit for 7 weeks there.

In the United Kingdom, a version by the Ink Spots was the sole hit version, charting at #10. It was also recorded by the Beverley Sisters and Shirley Wilson.

In 1957 a song unrelated, except by title, by The Ames Brothers, "Melodie D'Amour" (Melody Of Love) charted at #5.

Jim Reeves posthumously brought the song the country charts as "Why Do I Love You (Melody Of Love)" in late 1969-early 1970.

Recorded versions[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research. 
Preceded by
Mr. Sandman
Cash Box magazine best selling record chart
#1 record

February 5, 1955–March 19, 1955
Succeeded by
The Ballad of Davy Crockett