Michael Diven

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Michael B. Diven
Member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives
from the 22nd district
In office
January 02, 2001[1] – November 30, 2006[2]
Preceded by Frank Gigliotti
Succeeded by Chelsa Wagner
Personal details
Political party Democratic(until 2005, January 2009-May 2009)
Republican(2005-2009)
Residence Brookline, Pittsburgh
Alma mater Duquesne University

Michael B. Diven is a former member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives for the 22nd District. He was defeated in 2006.[3][4]

Diven is the son of Joey Diven, who Sports Illustrated once called "the world's toughest street fighter."[5] Diven graduated from Duquesne University in 1993.[6] He then served as a staff assistant to Allegheny County Commissioner Tom Foerster from 1993 through 1996.[6] In 1997, he was elected to represent 4th district of the Pittsburgh City Council at the age of 27, which made him the youngest person elected to that body at that time.[6]

At various times, he served as a member of the Brookline Area Community Council, as chairman of the Pittsburgh Public Safety Services committee, and on the board of the Penn State Allegheny County Cooperative Extension.[6] He co-founded the Police and Communities Together (PACT) organization and served as president of the South Pittsburgh Housing Task Force.[6] He served on the board of the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority (Alcosan) until he was removed from the board in 2008 by Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl.[6][7]

Diven won election to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in November 2000, following the resignation of Frank Gigliotti, who was convicted of soliciting bribes.[8] During his tenure, Diven clashed with Jack Wagner, Bill DeWeese and the leadership of the House Democratic Caucus, who later backed Richard A. Nerone's unsuccessful primary challenge in 2004.[5][9]

Citing the primary challenge and frustrated by the leadership's reluctance to pursue some of his agenda, including making health care benefits less expensive for school districts, Diven became a Republican in January 2005.[5] After he switched parties, the Democratic caucus fired his staff and cut the office phone lines.[5] That April, he unsuccessfully ran for the Pennsylvania Senate seat left vacant by Jack Wagner's 2004 election as Pennsylvania Auditor General, losing to Wagner-ally Wayne Fontana.[5][9][10]

In 2006, Diven was defeated by Jack Wagner's niece, Chelsa Wagner.[9] Diven returned to the Democratic party just in time to run for District Justice in Pittsburgh in 2009, where he faced and lost to his former employee and successor in Pittsburgh City Council, Jim Motznik.[11]

On two separate occasions, Diven was accused and staff members were indicted for forging signatures on nominating petitions.

Election history[edit]

Pennsylvania Senate, 42nd district, Special election
Year Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct
2005[10] Wayne Fontana 19,834 55.5 Michael Diven 13,353 37.4 Mark Rauterkus 2,542 7.1
Pennsylvania House of Representatives, 22nd district
Year Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct
2006[3] Chelsa Wagner 12,207 55.3 Michael Diven 9,849 44.7
2004[12] Michael Diven 21,481 100.0
2002[13] Michael Diven 12,548 70.2 Glenn P. Nagy 5,321 29.8
2000[14] Michael Diven 15,047 78.2 Harry T. Lewellen 4,196 21.8

References[edit]

  1. ^ "SESSION OF 2001 - 185TH OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY - No. 1" (PDF). Legislative Journal. Pennsylvania House of Representatives. 2001-01-02. 
  2. ^ Per Article II, Section 2 of the Pennsylvania Constitution, the legislative session ended on November 30, 2006
  3. ^ a b "2006 General Election - Representative in the General Assembly". Commonwealth of PA - Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. 2004. Retrieved 2009-01-09. 
  4. ^ Barnes, Tom (2006-08-20). "Democrats set sights on State House". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. PG Publishing Co., Inc. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Barnes, Tom (2005-01-30). "Brookline Democrat Diven switches to GOP". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. PG Publishing Co., Inc. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Representative Michael Diven". Official Webpage. Pennsylvania House Democratic Caucus. Archived from the original on 2004-01-14. Retrieved 2009-01-29. 
  7. ^ Lord, Rich (2008-10-02). "Mayor ousts ex-councilman Diven from Alcosan board". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. PG Publishing Co., Inc. 
  8. ^ Ove, Torsten (2000-06-22). "Gigliotti gets stiff sentence". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. PG Publishing. 
  9. ^ a b c Brown, David (2009-01-17). "New angle emerges in Wagner-Diven feud". Pittsburgh Tribune Review. Tribune-Review Publishing Co. 
  10. ^ a b "2005 Special Election for the 42nd Senatorial District". Commonwealth of PA - Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. 2004. Retrieved 2009-01-09. 
  11. ^ Belko, Mark (2009-01-18). "Pittsburgh councilman interested in district judge seat". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. PG Publishing, Inc. 
  12. ^ "2004 General Election - Representative in the General Assembly". Commonwealth of PA - Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. 2004. Retrieved 2009-01-09. 
  13. ^ "2002 General Election - Representative in the General Assembly". Commonwealth of PA - Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. 2004. Retrieved 2009-01-09. 
  14. ^ "2000 General Election - Representative in the General Assembly". Commonwealth of PA - Elections Information. Pennsylvania Department of State. 2004. Retrieved 2009-01-09. 

External links[edit]