Michael Scott Moore

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Michael Scott Moore
Michael Scott Moore reads at Politics & Prose bookstore, July 28, 2018
Moore reads at Politics & Prose bookstore, July 28, 2018
Born1969 (age 49–50)
Los Angeles, California
OccupationAuthor, journalist
LanguageEnglish, German
CitizenshipUS, Germany
Alma materUniversity of California, San Diego
Genrenon-fiction, fiction
Website
radiofreemike.net/home

Michael Scott Moore (born 1969) is an American journalist and novelist. He is the author of a history of surfing, Sweetness and Blood (2010), and a memoir about his captivity in Somalia, The Desert and the Sea.

Moore graduated from University of California, San Diego in 1991 with a degree in German Literature. He lives in Berlin and also holds German citizenship. In January 2012, he was abducted in Galkayo, Somalia while researching a book about piracy.[1] Moore was held captive for over two and a half years, and released September 22, 2014.[2]

Abduction[edit]

Moore (right) with fellow hostage Rolly Tambara at a reunion in Seychelles in 2018

Moore traveled to Somalia on a grant from the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting to research a book on piracy. He was abducted by a local gang of pirates in January 2012 in the town of Galkayo. Several days later, two aid workers, Jessica Buchanan and Poul Thisted, also being held by Somali pirates, were rescued by a Navy SEAL operation. The gang holding Moore subsequently demanded $20 million.[3]

American officials and the German Foreign Ministry collaborated on negotiations with the pirates, until Moore was freed September 22, 2014. It took 977 days for Moore to be released by the pirates after 1.6 million dollars was paid.[4]

Career[edit]

Moore has published three books, including the novel Too Much of Nothing,[5] published by Carroll & Graf, and the nonfiction history of surfing Sweetness and Blood: How Surfing Spread from Hawaii and California to the Rest of the World, with Some Unexpected Results, published by Rodale in 2010.[6] Sweetness and Blood was named a Best Book of 2010 by The Economist[7] and PopMatters.[8] The Desert and the Sea became a Nielsen besteller in August 2018, shortly after its publication on July 24, 2018.[citation needed]

Moore worked as the theater columnist for SF Weekly,[9] until he moved to Berlin, Germany in 2005. In Germany he worked as both a staff and a freelance editor for Spiegel Online International. In 2010-11 he covered a trial of ten Somali pirates in Hamburg who were charged with trying to hijack the MV Taipan.[10]

His journalism has been published in The Atlantic Monthly, The New Republic, and the Los Angeles Times. From 2009-2012 he also wrote a weekly column for Miller-McCune (now Pacific Standard) on trans-Atlantic issues, including the NATO effort against Somali pirates.[11] In 2009, for the column, he sailed on a NATO frigate charged with catching pirates in the Gulf of Aden.[12]

Works[edit]

  • Too Much of Nothing New York : Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2003. ISBN 9780786711963, OCLC 52460026
  • Sweetness and Blood: How Surfing Spread from Hawaii and California to the Rest of the World, with Some Unexpected Results. New York, NY : Rodale, 2010. ISBN 9781605294278, OCLC 922046069
  • The Desert and the Sea : 977 Days Captive on the Somali Pirate Coast, New York, NY : Harper Wave, 2018. ISBN 9780062449177, OCLC 967079760

References[edit]

  1. ^ Strange, Hannah. "Journalist Michael Scott Moore Released After Nearly Three Years as a Hostage". www.Vice.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  2. ^ "American-German Journalist Michael Scott Moore Released in Somalia". Der Spiegel. September 23, 2014. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  3. ^ "A War Journalist's Worst Case Scenario: The Kidnapping of Michael Scott Moore". Medium.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  4. ^ "American-German Journalist Michael Scott Moore Released in Somalia". Der Spiegel. September 23, 2014. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  5. ^ "Fiction Book Review: Too Much of Nothing by Michael Scott Moore". Publishersweekly.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  6. ^ Martin, Andy. "Book Review: Sweetness and Blood by Michael Scott Moore". NYTimes.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  7. ^ "Page Turners". www.economist.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  8. ^ Popmatters Staff. "The Best Non-Fiction of 2010". www.popmatters.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  9. ^ Sherbert, Erin. "Michael Scott Moore, Former SF Weekly Writer, Kidnapped by Somali Pirates". SFWeekly.com. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  10. ^ "A Precedent or a Farce? Court Faces Daunting Hurdles in Hamburg Pirate Trial". www.spiegel.de. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  11. ^ Moore, Michael Scott. "What Are Those Warships Doing Off Somalia?". psmag.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  12. ^ Moore, Michael Scott. "How Do You Prosecute a Pirate?". psmag.com. Retrieved 8 March 2015.