Miranda Gibson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Miranda Gibson is an environmental activist and school teacher from Australia who is known for her tree sitting to save the rainforest in Southern Tasmania from logging. Her 449 days spent up the tree is the longest running tree sit in Australian history.

Biography[edit]

On 14 December 2011, Gibson climbed up a 60 m (200 ft) old-growth Eucalyptus delegatensis tree, dubbed the 'Observer Tree', in the heart of Tasmania’s southern rainforest.[1][2] Gibson vowed to stay until the forest in the Styx Valley was protected. The area was due to be logged by a Malaysian company, Ta Ann.[1][3] After three months, her blog about the experienced had attracted over 50,000 views.[3]

Gibson had a 3 m (9.8 ft) platform built at the top of the tree,[4] and was connected to a safety harness at all times. During the sit she experienced snow, hail and gale-force winds.[5] She used a composting toilet, which she would lower down to her support crew on the ground, and slept under a tarp. A solar-powered computer and satellite technology enabled her to write a blog and attend environmental conferences, school groups and festivals by video link. Gibson did not come down from the tree at any point during the 451 days. Her tree sit broke the previous Australian record of 208 days, which was set in 1995.[5] At the one year anniversary she was thanked by Nick Cave, John Butler, Blue King Brown, Bob Brown and Julia Butterfly Hill.[4] Gibson had visitors on her platform during her tree sit, including her mother who stayed with her for four days.[5]

Gibson came down from the tree in March 2013 after 449[6] days as a safety precaution due to a nearby bushfire.[1][7] She voiced her disappointment in having to come down under those circumstances, though said she was proud of her achievement and vowed to keep fighting for Tasmania's forests.[8] In June 2013, Tasmania's Wilderness World Heritage Area was officially extended by 170,000 hectares (420,000 acres), which included the area her tree sit had been in. Gibson said she was thrilled with the decision; she had been contemplating returning to the tree if the World Heritage space had not been extended.[6][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Wildfire forces anti-logging activist from tree after 449-day vigil". Mongabay. 7 March 2013. Archived from the original on 29 June 2013. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  2. ^ "Media Release: The world celebrates the success of community action to protect forests". The Observer Tree. 24 June 2013. Archived from the original on 14 October 2017. Retrieved 14 October 2017.
  3. ^ a b Birch, Simon (12 April 2012). "Tree-top vigil highlights destruction of Tasmanian forest". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 October 2017. Retrieved 14 October 2017.
  4. ^ a b Sheperd, Tony (December 14, 2012). "Miranda Gibson has spent a year up a tree". News.com.au. Archived from the original on 30 March 2018.
  5. ^ a b c Williams, Glen (30 July 2012). "Miranda's treetop vigil: I've spent 299 days up here". Women's Day. Archived from the original on 30 June 2013. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  6. ^ a b Gibson, Miranda (24 June 2013). "I spent 449 days in a tree without touching the ground - it was all worth it". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 30 March 2018.
  7. ^ Milne, Christine (7 March 2013). "Wildfire ends Miranda's vigil. Brown fire probe call". Tasmanian Times. Archived from the original on 30 June 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2017.
  8. ^ "Australian tree-sitter ends 15-month protest after bushfire". BBC News. 7 March 2013. Archived from the original on 14 October 2017. Retrieved 14 October 2017.
  9. ^ Jabour, Bridie (June 24, 2018). "Tasmania's old growth forests win environmental protection". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 30 March 2018.