Moises Saman

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Moises Saman (born 1974) is a Spanish-American photographer, based in Tokyo.[1] He is considered "one of the leading conflict photographers of his generation"[2][3] and is a full member of Magnum Photos.[1] Saman is best known for his photographs from Iraq.[2] His book Discordia (2016) is about the revolution in Egypt and the broader Arab Spring.[4]

Saman has won multiple awards from World Press Photo[5][6][7] and Pictures of the Year International,[8][9] and has received a Guggenheim Fellowship.[10]

Life and work[edit]

Saman was born Lima, Peru. He is considered "one of the leading conflict photographers of his generation."[2][3] He worked as a photojournalist in the Middle East from 2011 to 2014.[11][12] He is best known for his photographs from the wars in Iraq: the Gulf War, the Iraq War, and the Iraqi Civil War[2] but has also worked in Afghanistan, Egypt, Libya,[3] and Syria[13] including in rebel-held areas there.[14] He covered the Arab Spring and the Syrian Civil War for The New Yorker[2][13] and has worked for Human Rights Watch.[4] It was during this period in the Middle East that he made Discordia (2016), a book of personal work about the revolution in Egypt and the broader Arab Spring.[4]

In 2010 Saman was invited to join Magnum Photos as a nominee and became a full member in 2014.[1]

Publications[edit]

Publications by Saman[edit]

  • Discordia. Self-published, 2016. Photographs and short essays by Saman. Edited and with collages by Daria Birang.

Publications with contributions by Saman[edit]

  • Home. Tokyo: Magnum Photos Tokyo, 2018. ISBN 978-4-9909806-0-3.

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Moises Saman: Spanish, American. b. 1974: Biography". Magnum Photos. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e Seymour, Tom (31 March 2016). "Moises Saman on Iraq's civil war". British Journal of Photography. Apptitude Media. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  3. ^ a b c Brook, Pete (16 September 2013). "Conflict Photographer's Best Pictures Are Some of Humanity's Worst Moments". Wired. Condé Nast Publications. Retrieved 3 February 2017.
  4. ^ a b c Bayley, Bruno (7 February 2014). "Moises Saman's Stunning Photos of Humanity in Conflict Zones". Vice. Retrieved 4 February 2017.
  5. ^ a b "Daily Life, third prize stories". World Press Photo. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  6. ^ a b "General News, third prize stories". World Press Photo. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  7. ^ a b "General News, second prize singles". World Press Photo. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  8. ^ a b "Winners of the Sixty-Fifth Annual Pictures of the Year International Competition Judged February 16 through March 7, 2008". Pictures of the Year International. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  9. ^ a b "Winners of the Seventy-Second Annual Pictures of the Year International Competition Judged February 2 - 20, 2015". Pictures of the Year International. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  10. ^ a b "Moises Saman". John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  11. ^ Bajekal, Naina (28 February 2016). "In Conversation: Photographer Moises Saman On His Journey Documenting the Arab Spring". Newsweek. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  12. ^ Jillani, Jehan (12 May 2016). "Five Years Later, a Photographer Revisits the Arab Spring". National Geographic. Retrieved 16 March 2016.
  13. ^ a b Filkins, Dexter (18 April 2014). "Moises Saman's Return to Iraq". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  14. ^ Lee Anderson, Jon (21 August 2012). "Moises Saman: Photographs from Rebel-Held Syria". The New Yorker. Retrieved 3 February 2017.
  15. ^ "2007 OPC Award Winners". Overseas Press Club. Retrieved 5 February 2017.
  16. ^ "Joseph Sywenkyj Receives $30,000 Grant from W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund in Humanistic Photography for Verses from a Nation in Transition". W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund. 15 October 2014. Retrieved 3 February 2017.
  17. ^ Little, Myles (9 April 2015). "Photojournalist Moises Saman Receives Guggenheim Fellowship". Time. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  18. ^ "Discordia – Moises Saman". www.anamorphosisprize.com. Retrieved 4 February 2017.

External links[edit]