Moseley Royal Commission

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The Moseley Royal Commission, officially titled the Royal Commission Appointed to Investigate, Report and Advise Upon Matters in Relation to the Condition and Treatment of Aborigines was a Royal Commission established by the Government of Western Australia in 1934 to hear evidence regarding the treatment of Aboriginal people.[1]

A O Neville[edit]

The Royal commission was to examine proposals to extend the powers of A. O. Neville, the 'Chief Protector of Aborigines', and the social policy of removal of children from their parents. Agitation by critics and the resulting media coverage in London[2] and locally [3] had brought attention to the Native Administration Act 1905–1936 (WA) Amendment(1911), and actions by, A. O. Neville.

A series of submissions detailing accusations of child slavery, abuse and mistreatment and the evidence was given by mothers of the removed children. The commission produced a report citing problems with the policy, but concluding to continue with the recommendations of Neville.[4]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "With the Aborigines Commission in the North.". Western Mail. Perth. 12 July 1934. p. 2 Supplement: Regular supplement – 'Pictorial section'. Retrieved 19 January 2013 – via National Library of Australia. 
  2. ^ "Commissioner's Report.". The West Australian. Perth. 27 June 1935. p. 19. Retrieved 19 January 2013 – via National Library of Australia. 
  3. ^ "Welfare of Aborigines.". The West Australian. Perth. 17 October 1934. p. 11. Retrieved 19 January 2013 – via National Library of Australia. 
  4. ^ Western Australia. Royal Commission Appointed to Investigate, Report and Advise Upon Matters in Relation to the Condition and Treatment of Aborigines; Moseley, Henry Doyle (1935), Report of the Royal Commissioner appointed to investigate, report, and advise upon matters in relation to the condition and treatment of Aborigines, Fred. Wm. Simpson, Government Printer, retrieved 19 January 2013 

References[edit]

  • David, Markovich (September 2003). "Genocide, a Crime of Which No Anglo-Saxon Nation Could be Guilty*". Murdoch University Electronic Journal of Law. 10 (3). Retrieved 2007-05-07. Criticism came from other quarters as well. Rischbieth, a witness to the Moseley Royal Commission and speaking on behalf of the Australian Federation of Women Voters, criticised the assistance provided to Aborigines.[301] In rejecting the government's "neglect" justification for child removals, she asserted that "government administrators … were forcibly removing children because it was cheaper than providing the same system of support which operated for neglected white children" 

Further reading[edit]