National Poverty Eradication Programme

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National Poverty Eradication Programme (NAPEP) is a 2001 program by the Nigerian government addressing poverty in Nigeria and related issues. It was designed to replace the Poverty Alleviation Program.

Background[edit]

Poverty in Nigeria remains significant despite high economic growth.[1] Nigeria has one of the world's highest economic growth rates (averaging 7.4%[2] over the last decade), a well-developed economy, and plenty of natural resources such as oil. However, it retains a high level of poverty, with 63% living on less than $1 per day,[3] implying a decline in equity. There have been governmental attempts at poverty alleviation, of which the National Poverty Eradication Programme (NAPEP) and National Poverty Eradication Council (NAPEC) are the most recent ones.[1]

NAPEP[edit]

National Poverty Eradication Programme (NAPEP) is a 2001 program by the Nigerian government aiming at poverty reduction, in particular, reduction of absolute poverty.[1] It was designed to replace the Poverty Alleviation Program.[1] NAPEP and NAPEC coordinate and oversee various other institutions, including ministries, and develop plans and guidelines for them to follow with regards to poverty reduction.[1] NAPEP goals include training youths in vocational trades, to support internship, to support micro-credit, create employment in the automobile industry, and help VVF patients.[4]

The program is seen as an improvement over the previous Nigerian government poverty-reduction programmes.[1] According to a 2008 analysis, the program has been able to train 130,000 youths and engaged 216,000 people , but most of the beneficiaries were non-poor.[4]

Incidents[edit]

Several concerns over corruption have been raised.[5]

In late May 2011, the program website was targeted by Nigerian hacktivists during the inauguration of Goodluck Jonathan.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Mike I. Obadan, POVERTY REDUCTION IN NIGERIA: THE WAY FORWARD, CBN ECONOMIC & FINANCIAL REVIEW, VOL. 39 N0. 4 Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "cenb" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  2. ^ Nigeria: Country Brief, Worldbank
  3. ^ Nigeria: Overview, DFID
  4. ^ a b Karl Wohlmuth; Reuben Adeolu Alabi; Phillippe Burger (November 2008). New growth and poverty alleviation strategies for Africa: B and regional Perspectives. LIT Verlag Münster. pp. 60–61. ISBN 978-3-8258-1542-4. Retrieved 5 July 2011. 
  5. ^ Nicholas Ibekwe, N600m stolen from poverty eradication programme
  6. ^ Cyber-hacktivism, The Economist, Jun 9th 2011

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]