National disaster recovery framework

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In September 2011, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) released the National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF), which serves as a companion document to the National Response Framework (NRF). The NDRF is a guide to promote effective recovery, particularly for those incidents that are large-scale or catastrophic. Similar to how the NRF is the overarching interagency response coordination structure for both Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act) and non-Stafford Act incidents, the NDRF will provide the overarching inter-agency coordination structure for the recovery phase for Stafford Act incidents, and elements of the framework may also be used for significant non-Stafford Act incidents.

The NDRF defines core recovery principles, roles and responsibilities of recovery coordinators and other stakeholders, a coordinating structure that facilitates communication and collaboration among all stakeholders, guidance for pre- and post-disaster recovery planning, and the overall process by which communities can capitalize on opportunities to rebuild stronger, smarter, and safer.[1]

The NDRF creates four new concepts:

Federal Disaster Recovery Coordinator (FDRC)[edit]

As the level of response activities declines and recovery activities accelerate, the Federal Disaster Recovery Coordinator (FDRC) will engage with the Recovery Support Function (RSF) agencies to organize and coordinate Federal recovery assistance. During this early recovery phase, the FDRC and the RSF coordinators are working closely with Emergency Support Function (ESF) leads to share information about impacts, assistance provided and working relationships at all levels.

State or Tribal Disaster Recovery Coordinators (SDRC or TDRC)[edit]

The role of the LDRMs, SDRCs and TDRCs is to organize, coordinate and advance the recovery at the local, State or Tribal level. The experience and skill sets of these individuals should include a strong basis in community development and good knowledge of the community’s demographics. While these positions will often interact with the emergency management community, it is not necessary that these individuals be emergency management professionals. Their primary role is to manage and coordinate the redevelopment and building of community. In addition, the individuals occupying the positions should be able to represent and speak on behalf of their respective chief executives (e.g., mayor, governor, Tribal leader). The LDRMs and TDRCs serve as the jurisdiction’s primary point of contact (POC) with the SDRC.

Local Disaster Recovery Managers (LDRM)[edit]

The NDRF strongly recommends that State governors as well as local government and Tribal leaders prepare as part of their disaster recovery plans to appoint Local Disaster Recovery Managers (LDRMs) and State/Tribal Disaster Recovery Coordinators (SDRCs/TDRCs) to lead disaster recovery activities for the jurisdiction. The role of the LDRMs, SDRCs and TDRCs is to organize, coordinate and advance the recovery at the local, State or Tribal level. The experience and skill sets of these individuals should include a strong basis in community development and good knowledge of the community’s demographics. While these positions will often interact with the emergency management community, it is not necessary that these individuals be emergency management professionals. Their primary role is to manage and coordinate the redevelopment and building of community. In addition, the individuals occupying the positions should be able to represent and speak on behalf of their respective chief executives (e.g., mayor, governor, Tribal leader). The LDRMs and TDRCs serve as the jurisdiction’s primary point of contact (POC) with the SDRC.

Recovery Support Functions (RSFs)[edit]

The RSFs are:

  1. Community Planning and Capacity Building
  2. Economic
  3. Health and Social Services
  4. Housing
  5. Infrastructure Systems
  6. Natural and Cultural Resources

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Disaster Recovery Framework". Federal Emergency Management Agency. Archived from the original on 2012-01-03. Retrieved 2011-12-31.

External links[edit]