Neal Hunt

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Senator
Neal Hunt
Neal Hunt.jpg
Member of the North Carolina Senate
from the 15th district
Assumed office
2005
Preceded by John H. Carrington
Personal details
Born (1942-09-17) September 17, 1942 (age 74)
Thomasville, North Carolina
Political party Republican
Residence Raleigh, North Carolina
Alma mater Hampden–Sydney College (BS)
Wharton School (MBA)
Occupation President, HMC Corporation
Website www.nealhunt.com

Neal K. Hunt serves as a Republican member of the North Carolina General Assembly representing constituents in Wake County in the fifteenth district of the North Carolina Senate. He was first elected to the Senate in 2004. He previously served two terms in an at-large seat on the Raleigh City Council.

Early life[edit]

Neal Hunt was born in Thomasville, North Carolina on September 17, 1942,[1] but grew up in the Raleigh area graduating from Ravenscroft School in 1960.[2] He then went on to receive his BS in Spanish from Hampden–Sydney College in 1964 and an MBA from Wharton School in 1968.[1]

Hunt went to work for Wachovia in Raleigh becoming a regional manager for commercial real estate lending. Later, he started his own real estate development firm.[2]

Political career[edit]

Hunt served for seven years on the Raleigh Planning Commission from 1993 to 2000. He then ran for an at-large seat on the Raleigh City Council winning two terms. He served from 2001 until his election to State Senate in 2004.[2]

Hunt first won election to the 15th district of the North Carolina Senate in 2004 after defeating a five-term incumbent John H. Carrington and newcomer Jean Koch in the Republican primary with 62.36% of the vote.[3] Hunt then won the general election race against Libertarian candidate Lee Griffin with 84.58% of the vote.[4]

In 2006, Hunt did not face any primary challenge and went on to face the Democratic nominee, community volunteer and former teacher Dorothy "Gerry" Bowles, who had previously lost to Carrington for the 15th district seat in 2002.[5] Hunt defeated Bowles 54.9%–45.1%.[6] Neither Hunt nor his general election challengers faced any primaries in 2008. The general election featured Hunt vs. the Democratic nominee, financial adviser Chris Mintz, and the Libertarian candidate Jan MacKay. Hunt won re-election with 52.83% of the vote.[7] Again having no primary challenger for his seat in 2010, Hunt faced Democratic candidate and state employee Charles Malone, in the general election. Hunt defeated Malone 60.55%–39.45%.[8]

Hunt was only challenged in the general election in 2012 by Sig Hutchinson, a Democratic marketing consultant and environmental activist.[9] Hunt defeated Hutchinson, 55.82%–44.18%.[10]

Hunt is Co-Chair of the Appropriations/Base Budget standing committee in the state senate.[11]

Stance on Marijuana[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Biography - Senator Neal K. Hunt". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved 14 December 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c "Alumnus Profile: State Senator Neal Hunt '60". Ravenscroft School. 1 May 2009. Retrieved 14 December 2011. 
  3. ^ "2004 Primary Election Results NC State Senate District 15" (PDF). NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 29, 2012. 
  4. ^ "2004 General Election Results NC State Senate District 15" (PDF). NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved 30 November 2011. 
  5. ^ Bonner, Lynn (November 2, 2006). "Democrat challenges Hunt for seat in Senate District 15". Raleigh News & Observer. 
  6. ^ "2006 General Election Results" (PDF). North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 29, 2012. 
  7. ^ "2008 General Election Results". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 29, 2012. 
  8. ^ "2010 General Election Results". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 29, 2012. 
  9. ^ Frank, J. B. (February 22, 2012). "Sig Hutchinson files to challenge Neal Hunt for state senate". Raleigh News & Observer. Retrieved November 29, 2012. 
  10. ^ "2012 General Election Results". North Carolina State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 29, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Standing Committee Assignments, 2011-2012 Session". North Carolina General Assembly. Retrieved November 29, 2012. 

External links[edit]