Nebraska School Activities Association

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Nebraska School Activities Association
Headquarters500 Charleston St.
Lincoln, Nebraska, United States 68501[1]
Membership
305 Schools[2]
Executive Director
Jay Bellar[3]
AffiliationsNational Federation of State High School Associations
Staff
13[4]
Websitensaahome.org

The Nebraska School Activities Association (NSAA) is a statewide organization which oversees interscholastic competition between high schools in the state of Nebraska. The NSAA is the only interscholastic activities association in Nebraska, thus, it serves both public and private schools.[5]

Classification[edit]

The NSAA divides schools into classes, which are determined by the size of the school's enrollment. Each activity has a varying number of classes, based on the amount of participating schools and the nature of the activity. As such, some classifications separate further into divisions, which are denoted by a 1 or 2 following the classification's letter. Additionally, each activity has its own standards for classification, meaning that a school may compete in a different classification for separate activities.[6]

NSAA Classifications[7][edit]

  • AA (Limited Use)
    • Only used for music-based activities; based on ensemble size.
  • A
    • Consists of schools with the largest enrollment size, does not separate into 1 and 2 divisions. Football teams play standard 11-man football.
  • B
    • Does not separate into 1 and 2 divisions. Football teams play standard 11-man football.
  • C
    • In certain activities, Class C separates into C1 and C2 divisions. Football teams play standard 11-man football.
  • D
    • In certain activities, Class D separates into D1 and D2 divisions. Football teams play 8-man football.
    • Starting in 2018, a third football-only division, D6, was established to play 6-man football (a version of the sport invented in Nebraska). This is a revival of Class D3, which the NSAA governed from 1987-1998; from 1999-2017, 6-man football in Nebraska was organized by associations other than the NSAA.[8]

[edit]

Unified Sports®[edit]

In coordination with the Special Olympics, The NSAA developed a set of activities which allow students with and without intellectual disabilities to participate together in a shared competition.[9] Currently, the NSAA offers two Unified Sports®; Unified Bowling and Unified Track and Field.[10]

Non-Sponsored Activities[edit]

Due to Title IX restrictions, limited participation of schools, or other reasons; certain activities are not sponsored by the NSAA, but, though external organizations, high school level competition is provided to Nebraskan high schools. Some of these activities include Cheer and Dance[11], Ice Hockey[12], and Trap Shooting[13]. Often times, schools organize non-sponsored activities as clubs, as a way to keep school affiliation regulated.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://nsaahome.org/contact-us/
  2. ^ https://nsaa-static.s3.amazonaws.com/textfile/about/1819enroll.pdf
  3. ^ https://journalstar.com/sports/high-school/nsaa-board-selects-bellar-as-next-executive-director/article_15bae614-ad65-5942-98ff-818ffedf7fa7.html
  4. ^ https://nsaahome.org/staff/
  5. ^ "State-Association-Listing". www.nfhs.org. Retrieved 2018-11-24.
  6. ^ "Activities Eligiblity" (PDF). Nebraska School Activities Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 November 2018.
  7. ^ "NSAA Classification" (PDF). Nebraska School Activities Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 November 2018.
  8. ^ "6-Man Football Championship Will be Under the NSAA Umbrella for First Time Since 1998". Sandhills Express. Retrieved 2018-11-24.
  9. ^ Powell, Ron. "Adding bowling among the proposals in front of NSAA Representative Assembly". JournalStar.com. Retrieved 2018-11-24.
  10. ^ "NSAA Unified Sports" (PDF). Nebraska School Activities Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 November 2018.
  11. ^ "Nebraska Coaches Association Cheerleading and Dance". www.ncacoach.org. Retrieved 2018-11-24.
  12. ^ "High School Club". Omaha Hockey Club. Retrieved 2018-11-24.
  13. ^ "Cornhusker School Trap Shoot". www.cornhusker-trap.com. Retrieved 2018-11-24.
  14. ^ ""High School Activities Bring Communities Together"". nsaahome.org. Retrieved 2018-11-24.

External links[edit]